Vitamins C and E May Prevent Cataracts

By Wickelgren, I. | Science News, May 20, 1989 | Go to article overview

Vitamins C and E May Prevent Cataracts


Wickelgren, I., Science News


Vitamins C and E May Prevent Cataracts

A Canadian epidemiologic study suggests vitamin C and vitamin E supplements help prevent cataracts in humans. The new findings, which seem to coroborate vitamin C-related results from a similar U.S. study, represent the first time researchers have shown a relationship between vitamin E intake and cataract prevention in humans, says study coauthor James McD. Robertson at the University of Western Ontario in London.

If confirmed, the work could lead to a "tremendous" public health benefit, says Allen Taylor of the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging in Medford, Mass. "If you could delay cataract formation by just 10 years, you would eliminate the need for half of the cataract extractions," he says. Cataracts, which can lead to blindness, afflict 20 percent of people between the ages of 60 and 75 in the United States, prompting half a million surgical procedures each year, Robertson says.

Animal studies have suggested a biological basis for the epidemiologic findings. Last year, Robertson's colleague John R. Trevithick and his team showed that diabetic -- and therefore cataractprone -- rats given high dietary levels of vitamin E had less lens-protein leakage than did controls, indicating reduced cataract formation in the treated rats. And experiments with guinea pigs have demonstrated that vitamin C boosts the amount of ascorbic acid in the eye, helping to stop cataract formation (SN: 6/28/86, p.410). Now that epidemiologic observations suggest these results may apply to humans, a clinical intervention trial appears warranted, Robertson says.

Robertson, Trevithick and Allan P. Donner compared the self-reported supplemental vitamin intake, general health, education and other demographic characteristics of 175 cataract patients over the age of 55 living in southwestern Ontario with those of 175 age- and sex-matched cataract-free adults. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Vitamins C and E May Prevent Cataracts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.