Letters


THE HUDSON, THE MOON, THE JEJUNE

Washington, DC

* Eric Alterman's July 2 "Full-Court Press" insinuates that the Hudson Institute "sent [scholar Evan Gahr] packing" because Gahr called Paul Weyrich an anti-Semite. This charge has no merit and presents a false impression of the institute. Alterman made no effort to contact us before writing his piece. Had he done so, he would have learned that Gahr's firing was an internal matter, unrelated to any ideas Gahr advocated.

For forty years, Hudson Institute has been a research organization that encourages debate among peers, affording scholars considerable latitude to express their ideas. Our researchers regularly voice opinions more controversial than Gahr's comments about Weyrich. Gen. William Odom (ret.), director of security studies at Hudson, was in fact quoted in the June 18 Nation, arguing for the dissolution of the CIA. Evidence for Hudson's eclecticism can be found in the fact that our scholars are Democrats and Republicans, liberals, moderates and conservatives. Moreover, in the past few months alone, two prominent contributors to The Nation--David Corn and Rick Perlman--have spoken at institute-sponsored events.

KENNETH WEINSTEIN,
Vice president and director
Hudson Institute

Los Angeles

* Eric Alterman apparently thinks lying is a form of mooning. In his case it's also compulsive, relentless and boring. For the record, I am obviously not a "staunch defender of the anti-Semites' right to blood-libel Jews," as he hilariously proposes; nor did I "expunge" or remove a single word, sentence, paragraph--let alone an entire article--by the equally addlebrained Evan Gahr from my website. Nation readers interested in the facts--Gahr's original article and Weyrich's, my commentaries on Gahr and Weyrich, Gahr's infantile complaints, Crouch's column, my answer and an account of the slanders against Laszlo Pastor by the Soviet occupiers of Communist Hungary, which Alterman and Conason eagerly spread--can find them with ease on my "censorious" website (www.frontpagemagazine.com). Such a waste of valuable Nation space that could have been put to better use defending the oppressed. David Horowitz

ALTERMAN REPLIES

New York City

* Weinstein says that I "insinuate" anti-Semitism on the part of the Hudson Institute. That's silly. I "insinuate" only cowardice. His defense, meanwhile, in making reference to Nation contributors sounds a great deal like the "some of my best friends..." line. When using it, however, he would be wise to get the names of his friends right. It is "Perlstein," not "Perlman." I hate to stereotype, but I hear Jews can be quite touchy about that kind of thing.

As for David Horowitz, well, I don't write about David Horowitz unless I'm getting paid for it.

ERIC ALTERMAN

GALE BREWER'S RUN

New York City

* Doug Ireland writes an article ["Those Big Town Blues," June 4] and a letter ["Exchange," July 2] asserting his positions on city politics and the Working Families Party and manages to make such an incorrect statement about one of the candidates that one wonders what else he has wrong. Ireland dismisses Gale Brewer's increasingly successful run for the City Council by describing her as "a longtime patronage employee of the Manhattan Borough President's Office." For the record, Brewer never worked for the Borough President's Office. She came onto my Council staff when I was first elected, in 1978, with no party or patronage ties of any kind. She established a record in that office of being available to constituents, solving problems of every type, attending to the needs of people who had never called a legislative office in their lives and training at least thirty student interns every year for eleven years. She won us the Daily News designation of Most Accessible Council Office. It is a great tribute to Gale that the contacts she made in the district in the 1980s are standing her in great stead in this campaign. …

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