THE MAN WHO CREATED GERI; Italian Image-Maker Who Sculpted the Most Talked about Body in Pop

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), July 21, 2001 | Go to article overview

THE MAN WHO CREATED GERI; Italian Image-Maker Who Sculpted the Most Talked about Body in Pop


Byline: ALEC MARR in Rome Exclusive

THIS is the man who secretly moulded Geri Halliwell into her sleek, multi-million pound image. Crack Italian superstar maker Luca Tommassini is the expert choreographer who prised Geri out of her Union Jack dress and into a gym.

And in doing so he has transformed the once curvy Ginger Spice into the lithe-bodied, raunchy sex goddess that she is today.

Geri has undergone one of the most dramatic changes in the history of pop. Weighing in at an amazing 28lbs lighter in just 18 months, she has become one of the world's fittest stars.

Gone is the plump figure, the ill-fitting dresses and the overall drag queen look she favoured during her Spice Girl days. Instead, Geri takes every opportunity to show off the toned body she has craved for so many years.

Thanks to the low carbohydrate diet favoured by the likes of Jennifer Aniston and other Hollywood stars, the curves Geri once displayed in hot pants and over-the-top glitzy dresses have been replaced by a super-toned, seven-stone physique.

Her stomach is rigidly flat, her legs are honed and even her arms are proof of the hours she has spent following a gruelling fitness regime.

Today, gymtastic Geri thinks nothing of taking a week-long break with friends on an Italian island - and throwing in two gruelling yoga sessions a day.

She claims she is now happy and healthy and no longer binge eating. Yet when Tommassini first saw former Spice Girl Geri, he despised her.

Not only did he think she was fat, he was convinced she could neither sing nor dance very well.

Tattooed Tommassini honed his skills while working with the likes of Madonna, Whitney Houston and Janet Jackson. But for the past three years, the 33 year old has been working his magic on Geri.

He says: "I always thought she was the best of the Spice Girls. But I still hated her. I realised she had talent, but I didn't like what she was doing.

"Then when I worked with her on a dance routine I noticed she had personality, even if she was short, fat, wasn't a good singer or dancer.

"But I knew she could really be someone. So I spoke to the record company and with her and we started work on making her what she is today.

"We work together, planning everything. …

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