"Rec-Reating" the Healthcare Paradigm

By Johnson, Kristen A.; Bland, Melanie K. et al. | Parks & Recreation, July 2001 | Go to article overview

"Rec-Reating" the Healthcare Paradigm


Johnson, Kristen A., Bland, Melanie K., Rathsam, Shannon M., Parks & Recreation


For centuries recreation, leisure and play have all been thought to have some sort of therapeutic value for persons with disabilities. However, the ways in which cultures have perceived the various healing qualities of recreation have changed within the context of societal transformations. Today, managed care continues to play an integral part in healthcare reform. Initial hospital stays are decreasing, and patients are being integrated into their communities faster than ever before. With decreased length of stays, it is becoming increasingly difficult to focus on individualized treatment plans. In order to successfully keep up with the changing times, hospital professionals must look to change and transcend traditional approaches of treatment.

Innovative Programming

With that philosophical foundation, the Recreation Therapy Department at Shiners Hospital for Children in Chicago is proactively leading change by implementing new and unique programs for children and teenagers with physical disabilities. The majority of these programs are outpatient based to help in transitioning from clinical to community recreation involvement as well as teaching life skills. Transitioning into community recreation often compliments healthcare objectives therefore making persons with disabilities active in a quest for better health and quality of life. These programs also seek to creatively combat two significant issues that often accompany physical disability: sedentary lifestyles and social isolation.

Spinal Cord Injury Sports and Conditioning Camp

One program gaining particular attention is the annual Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Sports and Conditioning Camp held at Shriners Hospital in Chicago. Studies have shown that rehabilitation facilities with strong recreation programs can have a tremendous impact on the population they serve, and individuals who specifically participate in wheelchair sports as a part of their rehabilitation process often continue some affiliation with the sport upon discharge. This increase in physical activity is correlated with the reduction in frequency and severity of secondary medical complications and increase in self-esteem. Thus, children and adolescents who participate in sports activities as a part of their rehabilitation are more likely to be independent as well as physically and psychologically healthy post discharge.

With this in mind, Shriners Hospital began its SCI Sports and Conditioning Camp in 1996 as a proactive approach to treatment. Each year eight teenagers with spinal cord injuries are admitted to the hospital exclusively for a weeklong exposure to a wide variety of sports. The goal of the camp is to facilitate extensive leisure education by involvement in hands-on experiences with as many sports as possible in a socially comfortable environment. The camp covers a variety of activities that include kayaking, tennis, basketball, bowling, scuba diving, sled hockey, horseback riding, and sailing. Body composition and fitness levels are also assessed to give campers an idea of their overall competency and progress.

The eight adolescents are selected by an interdisciplinary team. Campers are selected on the basis of their ability and injury level. All campers are independent in bowel and bladder programs, transfers, and are free of pressure ulcers. The campers are also individuals who have demonstrated an interest and motivation to become involved in sports. Campers come from all over the United States -- some from inner cities and others from rural areas. The camp is free of charge, and every camper receives a subscription to Sports N' Spokes, a scuba mask and snorkel, a basketball, a tennis racquet and balls, a camp T-shirt, a Spinal Network book, and expert instruction by a community recreation agency/individual in up to eight sports.

Continuing Involvement is Encouraged

Leisure education is prevalent throughout the camp. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

"Rec-Reating" the Healthcare Paradigm
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.