Use of Government Resources Outline

Journal of Power and Ethics, January 2001 | Go to article overview

Use of Government Resources Outline


I. References.

A. 10 U.S.C. [sections] 974; 2012; 2541-2553; 2632; 2637.

B. 31 U.S.C. [section] 1301; 1344; 1349.

C. Exec. Order No. 12674 (Apr. 12, 1989) as amended by Exec. Order No. 12731, Principles of Ethical Conduct for Government Officers and Employees (Oct. 17, 1990).

D. DoD 5500.7-R, Joint Ethics Regulation, with Change 4, dated 6 August 1998.

E. DoD 4500.36-R, Management, Acquisition, and Use of Motor Vehicles (29 Mar. 1994).

F. DoD 4515.13-R, Air Transportation Eligibility, November 1994.

G. DoD Directive 5410.18, Community Relations (Jul. 3, 1974).

H. DoD Directive 1100.20, Support and Services for Eligible Organizations and Activities Outside the Department of Defense (Jan. 30, 1997).

I. DoD Instruction 5410.19, Armed Forces Community Relations (Jul. 19, 1979).

J. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-126, "Improving the Management and Use of Government Aircraft," 22 May 1992.

K. 5 C.F.R. Part 251, Agency Relationships with Organizations Representing Federal Employees and Other Organizations (1998).

L. 41 C.F.R. Subpart 101-20.4, Occasional Use of Public Buildings (1997).

M. 41 C.F.R. Subpart 101-35.2, Authorized Use of Long Distance Telephone Services (1997).

N. AR 1-211, Attendance of Military and Civilian Personnel at Private Organization Meetings (1 June 1984).

O. AR 58-1, Management, Acquisition, and Use of Administrative Use Motor Vehicles (C1, 1 March 1981).

P. AR 210-1, Private Organizations on Department of the Army Installations (15 July 1981).

Q. Secretary of Defense Memorandum, DoD Policy on the use of Government Aircraft and Air Travel, 1 October 1995.

R. Secretary of the Army Memorandum, Policy for Travel by Department of the Army Officials, December 8, 1995.

II. Introduction.

A. Methodology for Determining Permissible Uses of Government Resources.

(1) The Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch, 5 C.F.R. Part 2635, acknowledge that "there may be circumstances when an employee may properly use Government property or official time for activities other than the performance of the official duties of the employee's position." Office of Government Ethics (OGE) Letter to General Counsel, Office of Personnel Management, dated March 21, 1997.

(2) Under 5 C.F.R. 2635.704, an employee must protect and conserve Government property and refrain from using or allowing its use for purposes other than those for which it is made available to the public or those authorized in accordance with law or regulation. This section was intended to make it clear that "authorized purposes" may be purposes that do not strictly relate to the performance of official duties.

(3) Thus, by definition, employees who use government property in accordance with applicable laws and regulations do not violate the standards. OGE Informal Advisory Letter 95 X 13, 1995 WL 855438 (Dec. 1, 1995).

B. Authority to Regulate the Use of Government Property.

(1) General Services Administration (GSA) and the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) are authorized to promulgate executive branch-wide regulations governing the use of government resources.

(2) Except as limited by statute or regulation, federal agencies possess the discretion to promulgate departmental regulations governing the use of government resources. OGE Informal Advisory Letter 93 X 6, 1993 WL 721226, Mar. 10, 1993.

(3) The Office of Government Ethics (OGE) does not have the authority to promulgate any expansion or limitation of other regulations governing the use of government property. OGE Informal Advisory Letter 95 X 13, 1995 WL 855438, Dec. 1, 1995.

III. Fiscal Underpinnings.

A. Appropriated funds are available only for the objects for which the appropriations were made. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Use of Government Resources Outline
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.