Boost Your Spiritual IQ; Give Peace a Chance and Be One with the Universe

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), July 25, 2001 | Go to article overview

Boost Your Spiritual IQ; Give Peace a Chance and Be One with the Universe


Byline: CHARLOTTE MORTENSSON

THEY have the fame, they have the fortune and, very often, they have the partner of their dreams.

Yet countless celebs seem to lose the plot and throw it all away.

One minute they're smiling out of our TV screens and playing happy families, the next minute they're ruining their lives with drugs, drink - or a series of lies that land them in prison.

The question, of course, is why they blew it.

One answer is now thought to be that the people who find it difficult to appreciate what they have, don't take sufficient care of themselves, or consider those around them may be short on what is being called "spiritual intelligence".

This isn't at all the same as being religious, or spending all your time chanting and doing yoga.

Tony Buzan, lecturer and author of several best-selling books about the mind, says: "Being spiritually intelligent means you are able to see the bigger picture.

"You can look beyond yourself and your immediate problems. You have a sense that you are part of the universe, your life has a purpose and you are able to appreciate all the little pleasures which make it worthwhile."

The concept of spiritual intelligence is a relatively new one. Tony says: "For the last 100 years or so our education has focused on numeric and verbal intelligence and this is how IQ is measured traditionally. But we now know that there are many different types of intelligence, including creative, sensual, social and physical.

"If you can use all your intelligences life becomes much easier and more satisfying."

Spiritual intelligence is particularly important for both mental and physical health for a number of reasons.

If you can keep the bigger picture in mind, you're much less likely to be anxious, bored or depressed.

You'll therefore sleep better, your immune and nervous system get stronger and you're more energised and motivated.

You'll also feel happier and more content, which lowers blood pressure and reduces heart problems.

Just as numerical intelligence is sharpened by doing lots of arithmetic, spiritual intelligence is also developed through practise.

Sure, we're all more naturally gifted at some things than others, but the brain is a muscle and we can strengthen any aspect of it that we choose.

Start developing your spirituality with a selection of work-outs adapted from Tony Buzan's latest book, The Power of Spiritual Intelligence.

Five aspects of spirituality are given, with specific exercises to develop each of them. They're simple and, if you're already spiritually aware, you may be doing some of them already.

1NURTURE YOURSELF

SPIRITUALITY isn't about looking after others or devoting yourself to some worthy cause and neglecting yourself in the process.

Tony says: "All the great spiritual leaders exhorted people to love others as you love yourself, not more than yourself.

"If you are going to help others and achieve what you want, you have to be as strong and healthy as possible.

"People are also more likely to respect and listen to someone who has that positive glow of health around them than someone who always looks under the weather."

THE WORKOUT

ACCORDING to Tony, the first principle of spiritual intelligence is the realisation that you are a miracle and are wonderful.

He adds: "Each one of us is more precious, beautiful and valuable than the most rare jewel."

Remind yourself of this fact every morning when you wake up. It'll give the incentive you need to take care of yourself.

However rushed you are, eat at least one healthy meal and a couple of pieces of fruit every day. You need good fuel to function.

Make a habit of pausing every hour or so and tuning in to what your body's telling you.

Does it need a quick walk round the block, a stretch, a glass of water? …

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