Happy Returns

By Elfin, David | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 25, 2001 | Go to article overview

Happy Returns


Elfin, David, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: David Elfin

CARLISLE, Pa. - The "Welcome, Washington Redskins" sign is up again outside Rillo's. The Super Bowl XXVI championship plaque has been dusted off at the G-Man. The grass at Biddle Field is freshly mowed.

Bubba and the boys are coming back to town . . . Sunday.

The economy of this college town of 20,000 has survived quite nicely - thanks largely to car shows at the fairgrounds - since the Redskins jilted their summer home of 32 years and moved from Dickinson College to Maryland's Frostburg State University in 1995.

"Our business has greatly increased each month. June and July were very strong, so it's hard to say how much of a difference having the Redskins in town is going to make for us," said Heather Kattouf, general manager of the Comfort Suites in downtown Carlisle. "But we are offering a special Redskins rate for fans and media."

Neither Carlisle nor the Redskins, who broke their contract with Frostburg to train at Redskin Park last summer, were quite the same without each other.

It was in Carlisle, after all, where Vince Lombardi began the Redskins' renaissance in 1969, where George Allen turned them into contenders in 1971 and where Joe Gibbs molded three Super Bowl champions from 1982 to 1991.

"I always thought the Redskins would be back because this is where they trained when they were winning," said restaurateur Joe Rillo, whose parents used to feed coaches and players at their home when the business was closed on Sundays back in the 1960s.

Those were the days of six-week training camps, of boys will be boys hi-jinks, of innumerable rookies standing on chairs singing off-key renditions of college fight songs and of post-bed check exits out the back door of Adams Hall to the G-Man (officially the Gingerbread Man).

Today, training camp is half as long, there are only half as many rookies to harass and many of the millionaire veterans are too busy checking on their stock portfolios or too worried about staying in top shape to have much time for carousing in Carlisle.

But while cornerback Darrell Green, trainer Bubba Tyer and assistant general manager Bobby Mitchell are the only current Redskins employees who have summered at Dickinson, it might not take long for a new generation of Redskins to fall in love with Carlisle.

"This is where my career started, so to me this is the most beautiful place in the world," said Green, a 12-year Carlisle resident, on the eve of the Redskins' 1994 departure.

That feeling is mutual.

"When my husband and I were in Hawaii in 1983, we were asked where we were from, and we were proud to say that we were from Carlisle, Pennsylvania , summer home of the Super Bowl champion Washington Redskins," said Arlene Merisotis, owner of George's Subs and Pizza, just down High Street from Dickinson.

"It's fun when you see houses down the street from yours on ESPN," said G-Man manager Dan Miller, who fondly remembers Redskins greats Russ Grimm and Dave Butz as regulars at the establishment. "Having the Redskins and their fans here enhances the quality of life just by having a more metropolitan crowd for a month."

And the Redskins, who considered William & Mary, Gettysburg and Richmond among other colleges before coming back to Dickinson, know that they're in good hands. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Happy Returns
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.