Beijing Hits U.S. Residents with Jail Terms

By Barber, Ben; Wagner, Arlo | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 25, 2001 | Go to article overview

Beijing Hits U.S. Residents with Jail Terms


Barber, Ben, Wagner, Arlo, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Ben Barber and Arlo Wagner

China yesterday sentenced two U.S. residents, including American University scholar Gao Zhan, to 10 years in prison for espionage, roiling relations just two days before a visit to Beijing by Secretary of State Colin L. Powell.

Later, China deported an American business professor who had been convicted 10 days earlier, the Foreign Ministry announced early today.

Li Shaomin, a Chinese-born naturalized American citizen was expelled to the United States, the ministry said in a brief written statement.

The Associated Press, quoting a U.S. official in Beijing, reported that Mr. Li was being flown to San Francisco.

Mr. Li's expulsion had been expected since he had been ordered out of the country following his July 14 conviction.

However, the sentencing of Mrs. Gao and a second U.S. based academic, Qin Guangguang, to lengthy prison terms came as a double blow to U.S.-China relations. It came one a day before Mr. Powell was to meet Chinese Foreign Minister Tang Jiaxuan in Hanoi before traveling on to Beijing.

"We are dismayed by the outcome," said a spokesman for Mr. Powell, who is to attend a meeting today of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. "We are concerned by the lack of transparency."

U.S. officials were not permitted to attend the trial of Mrs. Gao, 39, whose husband and son live in the Washington area. They also were not permitted to attend the trial of a second scholar with U.S. permanent resident status, Qin Guangguang, who also received a 10-year sentence. Mr. Qin reportedly taught at U.S. universities and worked for a U.S. medical group in Beijing.

A third person, Chinese national Qu Wei, was sentenced to 13 years yesterday for providing documents to Mrs. Gao.

A series of recent arrests of U.S. based scholars has alarmed the academic world because their activities, such as collecting Chinese newspaper and magazine articles, had been considered routine.

A U.S. official who closely monitors China said it was believed within the U.S. government that one or both of the American residents sentenced yesterday would be released as a gesture of good will before or during Mr. Powell's visit.

"You have to admire China's cunning and deception" in arresting scholars such as Mrs. Gao and then releasing them as gestures of good will, said the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

"These cases are a clever way to raise the bar. They say that if you even so much as Xerox unclassified documents on Taiwan, it's espionage. They are crushing the human rights movement, and anyone with U.S. connections who would try to discuss Taiwan policy can be jailed."

The Powell spokesman said the United States was disappointed at being barred from Mrs. Gao's trial, which lasted less than three hours. Members of Mrs. Gao's family were also refused permission to attend.

The spokesman said Mr. Powell would raise the case in his meeting with Mr. Tang in Hanoi today and with Chinese officials in Beijing the following day.

Supporters and lawyers for Mrs. Gao said at a Washington news conference that the evidence against her consisted of photocopies of publications and writings about Taiwan and women's rights. None was marked "classified," and all are readily available throughout the free world, said Sen. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Beijing Hits U.S. Residents with Jail Terms
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.