LETTERS: Your Views

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), July 26, 2001 | Go to article overview

LETTERS: Your Views


Another part of our city's proud history bites the dust

NOW it's demolition of our trade union history.

Thank you, Evening Telegraph, for your article (July 18) of Tom Mann, his work for social justice and the club built to honour his memory.

I hope the planning officer concerned (the proposal is to demolish the Tom Mann Club and build houses on the site) will recognise the importance of preserving our history and especially the trade union history of our city.

Why is it that so many Coventry people who care about their city seem to be always fighting a rearguard action to stop the destruction of their history and their memories of our city and its people?

We have lost our theatre and our historic public houses. Cathedral Lanes, although an attractive building by today's standards, is in the wrong place, hiding the beautiful view of the south side of Holy Trinity Church and access to the cathedral.

It would have been better placed in Spon Street where the council had started to make a good job of preserving the mediaeval buildings.

Are there any councillors who value Tom Mann's work for social justice, who respect those who want to honour his memory and who value the five trees destined to be destroyed?

Perhaps more importantly these days with centralised power and the disenfranchising committee system, could they actually influence the decision-making process if they wanted to?

Clive Robinson,

Daventry Road, Cheylesmore.

Name and shame

REPORTS and pictures of the mindless idiots that endanger the lives of those that use our railway systems (Evening Telegraph, July 16) have prompted me to put pen to paper.

Reporting restrictions on juveniles are making heroes out of these youths.

The pictures you published recently had the faces of the idiots on the tracks obscured when really they should be shown in all their glory - if nothing else to bring it to the attention of their parents.

Kids nowadays believe that they can get away with absolutely anything, knowing they cannot be identified if caught in a compromising situation.

If unruly youths know that a "name and shame" situation existed, they may be less inclined to cause a nuisance to others.

The youths in question were obviously of an age where they knew right from wrong, so why treat them with kid gloves?

Show them that we will not tolerate this sort of behaviour.

The publication of their faces might not only lead to their prosecution but also act as a deterrent to others.

Parental responsibility could also be called into question at this point. With the school holidays on us now, do parents really know where their children are and what they are up to?

I feel extremely sorry for the drivers of these trains - stress levels must be sky high, not knowing what may be laid in front of their train.

Nuneaton resident, name and address supplied.

Religious worry

THE BBC has broken with long-standing tradition and appointed a non-Christian head of religious broadcasting for the first time in nearly seven decades.

Those who subscribe to the modern Emperor's New Clothes syndrome of religious politics have welcomed the appointment.

The reaction of the realists has ranged from a Victor Meldrew: "I don't believe it!" to grave concern whether or not this is a pointer to the future of religious broadcasting.

Prior to the recent General Election, my organisation urged members of the public to question candidates, regarding their views on Christian broadcasting, as well as the regulation of the media.

Some of us still believe that a fundamental principle for leadership is personal example. We look forward to learning the views of Christian broadcasters.

C T Wareing, chairman, Midlands regional branch, Mediawatch UK, formerly, (National Viewers and listeners' Association). …

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