I Spent Pounds 100,000 to Turn Myself into a Tiger; Daft Dennis Is Big Game Fur a Laugh

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), August 2, 2001 | Go to article overview

I Spent Pounds 100,000 to Turn Myself into a Tiger; Daft Dennis Is Big Game Fur a Laugh


Byline: SIMON HOUSTON

CRAZY Californian Dennis Smith has spent a fortune on tattoos and plastic surgery to look like a tiger.

It has taken 20 years and pounds 100,000 to transform him from a wimpy bespectacled computer geek into the closest a man can look to a big cat.

It began when he tattooed his face with the striped markings of the tiger.

Then he decided to have every single one of his teeth filed down to needle points.

He even had his upper lip cosmetically altered so he's in a permanent snarl and has had six-inch latex whiskers implanted.

His fingernails have been crafted into sharp talons while his hands have tattooed markings like a tiger's paws.

The short back and sides he sported at the University of California, where he was a speccy swot, has been replaced with a long orange mane.

And the glasses have been swapped for green contact lenses that make him look darkly evil in the brightest sunlight.

Smith has also changed his name by deed poll to Catman.

In fact, the only thing still recognisable from his college days is his first-class honours degree.

He is surprisingly brainy and holds down an pounds 80,000-a-year computer programming job which enables him to fund the sugery.

Catman also owns an apartment, drives a car, doesn't drink and insists he's as sane as anyone else in California ... which might not mean much, of course.

He admitted: "Of course people stare at me when I walk down the street. But that's the effect I desire. For so long I have equated myself with the tiger that I decided to change myself into one. …

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