Now in Vivo: Altering Endothelial Cells

By Cowen, R. | Science News, June 17, 1989 | Go to article overview

Now in Vivo: Altering Endothelial Cells


Cowen, R., Science News


Now in vivo: Altering endothelial cells

Like the bed of a swiftly moving river, endothelial cells lining blood vessel walls maintain intimate contact with blood flowing throughout the body. Such proximity tantalizes researchers who seek cells they might genetically alter to deliver a steady flow of medication through the bloodstream or secrete chemicals to bust blood clots.

Investigators have already succeeded in inserting some types of genes into the DNA of cultured endothelial cells, causing the cells to secrete the gene's enzyme product in vitro. Now, for the first time, two independent research groups report successfully implanting genetically altered endothelial cells into the arteries of live animals. The cells, they say, produced the desired enzyme product.

The researchers chose an enzyme that is easily detectable but cannot treat disease. Nevertheless, they say their work takes a key step toward genetic therapy via the circulatory system. Moreover, suggests James M. Wilson of the University of Michigan Medical Center in Ann Arbor, some of their findings may lead to improved success with small-diameter vascular grafts -- often required by diabetics who have damage to small blood vessels.

Wilson and his colleagues at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston and The Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass., used a retrovirus to insert a bacterial gene called lacZ into endothelial cells extracted from the blood vessels of seven dogs. They grew the genetically altered cells along the interior of Dacron tubes 4 millimeters in diameter, forming grafts to splice into the carotid arteries of the same dogs. Five weeks later, the researchers stained the cells to reveal betagalactosidase, an enzyme produced by the lacZ gene. They describe their work in the June 16 SCIENCE.

According to W. French Anderson of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, physicians perform about 350,000 vascular grafts in the United States each year and about 100,000 of these fail, in part because small-diameter grafts tend to clog or collapse. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Now in Vivo: Altering Endothelial Cells
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.