Officials Huddle, Talk Hurricanes

By Stepzinski, Teresa | The Florida Times Union, August 9, 2001 | Go to article overview

Officials Huddle, Talk Hurricanes


Stepzinski, Teresa, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Teresa Stepzinski, Times-Union staff writer

BRUNSWICK -- When it comes to global satellite imagery showing flooding and wind damage, red ink is bad. Unfortunately, a satellite map of coastal Georgia would be awash in red ink showing many such areas, a scientist says.

"You'll want to stay in the blue. That's the highest ground," said David M. Bush, a coastal geologist and assistant professor of geoscience at State University of West Georgia in Carrollton.

Bush and his university colleague Rebecca Dodge were among the featured speakers at a daylong hurricane preparedness workshop in Brunswick sponsored by the University of Georgia Marine Extension Service and Sapelo Island Estaurine Research Reserve.

The workshop was attended by about 30 city, county, fire and emergency management officials from Glynn, Camden, Bryan and Liberty counties.

Bush presented color-coded maps assessing the severity of damage received by Camden and McIntosh counties in a hurricane. The maps incorporate satellite imagery in conjunction with an analysis of such coastal geological features as vegetation beach sand dunes, maritime forests, wetlands and salt marshes.

Bush and Dodge said counties can create similar maps by documenting those geological features, then checking them for changes at least once a year. Once a baseline map is established, they can use it to calculate the degree and extent inland that hurricane would most likely occur, they said.

"We've been looking at geological indicators such as flood zones, tidal paths, dune structure and vegetation. And we're also trying to do a statistical analysis to see if they correlate to the damage done," Bush said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Officials Huddle, Talk Hurricanes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.