Look Lively to Get the Best out of Clearing; Careers and Education: Special Report: Some of the Basic Principles of Clearing Were Looked at Last Week. Today, with A-Level Results Due out This Week and the First Official Clearing List Available on Thursday, We Examine the Process in More Detail. Springboard Editor Stella Greavy Reports

By Greavy, Stella | The Mail on Sunday (London, England), August 12, 2001 | Go to article overview

Look Lively to Get the Best out of Clearing; Careers and Education: Special Report: Some of the Basic Principles of Clearing Were Looked at Last Week. Today, with A-Level Results Due out This Week and the First Official Clearing List Available on Thursday, We Examine the Process in More Detail. Springboard Editor Stella Greavy Reports


Greavy, Stella, The Mail on Sunday (London, England)


Byline: STELLA GREAVY

CLEARING is a time for quick thinking and prompt action, but getting involved in the process should not be a hit-and-miss affair.

With careful research, the chances are that potential students will still find vacancies on degree courses that they are really interested in at a university they really want to go to.

Finding a course place during Clearing often means that students have to broaden their ideas about the sort of course they want to do or what kind of university they want to go to.

With about 15,000 course vacancies at institutions across Britain during Clearing, they will not be short of choices. So it is important not to accept a place that they are not happy about.

To start with, students should make sure that they get a Clearing list as soon as the first one is published. They are available from UCAS online at www.ucas.com, The Independent and The Independent on Sunday, The Times, the Daily Express and The Guardian.

Once they have found vacancies that interest them, they should track down as much information as they can from prospectuses and websites about the courses, as content can vary enormously.

They should aim to discover the following information: Teaching methods, methods of assessment, course length and the type of qualification given.

When choosing a university, they should also think about the following:

* What size is the university - is it large and busy or small and quiet?

* What kind of facilities does it have? What computer resources, libraries, student services and careers advice are available?

* What is the social life like? Is there a good student union and are there lots of clubs and societies?

* What is the travelling like - how far from home is it, how good is local transport?

* What are the costs involved - is it an expensive or cheap place to live?

By the time students have thought through their selection, their clearing entry form (CEF) should have arrived. They should fill this in and then get ready to start phoning the universities they are interested in.

The admissions tutor is the person students will usually speak to at the university.

Though the conversation may seem relaxed and the questions straightforward, it is vital to treat the phone conversation as if it is an interview. After all, it is the one chance for students to sell themselves to an institution.

For this reason they should highlight their good points, though it is worth being reasonably humble. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Look Lively to Get the Best out of Clearing; Careers and Education: Special Report: Some of the Basic Principles of Clearing Were Looked at Last Week. Today, with A-Level Results Due out This Week and the First Official Clearing List Available on Thursday, We Examine the Process in More Detail. Springboard Editor Stella Greavy Reports
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.