Daschle's Attempted Bush-Baiting Backfires

By Anderson, Alan L. | Insight on the News, August 20, 2001 | Go to article overview

Daschle's Attempted Bush-Baiting Backfires


Anderson, Alan L., Insight on the News


Mark down the date -- July 18, 2001. That's the day Sen. Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) committed his first major gaffe since becoming majority leader barely a month before. Whether the liberal Washington media pack choose to harp on the comments Daschle made that day as a serious faux pas, both the timing and the substance of those remarks indicate that he may not be quite as ready to run political rings around bumbling, fumbling George W. Bush as his many groupies in the press predicted in June.

Daschle's remarks came during a breakfast meeting with editors of USA Today and Gannett newspapers. According to USA Today, Daschle charged that the administration's failure to engage on a wide range of international issues was eroding U.S. leadership in the world.

To date, much of the press coverage of Daschle's comments has focused on their timing, coming as they did as President Bush was flying to Europe. There is, or was, an unwritten rule -- politicians mute their criticism of the president when he is traveling beyond America's shores. Daschle violated that rule, and it strains credulity to claim that Daschle was unaware that he was doing so. Rather, one suspects Daschle violated the rule hoping he would sting the White House into an angry response, thus guaranteeing maximum press coverage of Daschle's criticism, allowing Daschle and the Democrats to argue that the Republicans did it to Bill Clinton and allowing the thrust of Daschle's comments to stand.

Suffice it to say things haven't worked out the way Daschle may have hoped. Informed of Daschle's comments, USA Today quotes White House spokesman Scott McClellan as terming them "a disappointing departure from the long-standing bipartisan tradition of the Senate majority leader when it comes to American foreign policy." Bush, asked about Daschle's comments, expressed a similar sentiment. National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice was dispatched to call Daschle, express her disappointment and discuss Daschle's concerns.

But the success of the White House response to Daschle was apparent when Tim Russert, questioning Daschle on NBC's Meet the Press, picked up on the White House spin. He asked Daschle point blank, "Senator, are they suggesting that you're not ready to be majority leader?"

This came after Bush political adviser Karen Hughes expressed the hope that we could chalk this episode up to the fact that the majority leader still was learning the ropes of his new job. Senate Minority Leader Trent Lott of Mississippi suggested that this was the sort of thing that happens when one still has "training wheels" on one's bike. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Daschle's Attempted Bush-Baiting Backfires
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.