Women Quit the Sidelines to Tackle Professional Football

The Mirror (London, England), September 6, 2001 | Go to article overview

Women Quit the Sidelines to Tackle Professional Football


Byline: GERRY DUFFY

SCOTS women are finally taking men on at their own game by signing up for a unique shot at becoming professional footballers.

The first batch of trainees with First Division side Ross County are already aiming to prove their skills in women's profesional leagues in the USA, Italy or Japan.

And for those who stay in Scotland after the training, they'll reach their goal by fulfilling their potential - and giving the game's men-only myth the red-card.

The course, backed by many clubs and the SFA, will coach youngwomen to a professional level, while leaving them time to earn a living elsewhere.

Eight budding footballers aged between 16 and 22 - including twins Suzanne and Shelly Grant, Lorraine Cadden, Kimberley Gollan, Lisa McKenzie and Kirsten MacDonald - have been snapped up for the scheme at County, where they will also be taught subjects such as computing, first aid and recreation skills.

Despite the lack of opportunity for women to play full-time in this country, organisers claim it is still worthwhile.

Scotland's women's team boss Vera Pauw, wife of Rangers assistant manager Bert Van Lingen, is certain the game is growing here among women.

A recent study showed that more than 20,000 women play football regularly in Scotland.

Ms Pauw said: "Some people may think that there is no point in backing women's football and that is up to them.

"But people have the right to develop their talent whatever that may be.

"If they have a talent or skill, it is a human right for them to be able to develop that as much as they can.

"The profile of women's football has increased dramatically over the past few years and is moving in the right direction. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Women Quit the Sidelines to Tackle Professional Football
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.