Serene Williams; Venus Takes a Lead from Little Sister

By Fraser, Alan | Daily Mail (London), September 8, 2001 | Go to article overview

Serene Williams; Venus Takes a Lead from Little Sister


Fraser, Alan, Daily Mail (London)


Byline: ALAN FRASER

SERENA Williams last night pledged no repeat of her great Wimbledon fiasco after she and her sister booked their first match-up in a major final.

The mockery of the Wimbledon semi-final between Venus and Serena at Wimbledon last year prompted allegations of parental manipulation. But after Serena crushed Martina Hingis 6-3, 6-2 in an embarrassingly one- sided affair to reach the U.S. Open final, she promised a battle worthy of the occasion.

Serena said: 'If you notice, the winner gets $850,000, so I won't have any problem going out there and trying to win. I was pretty disappointed at that Wimbledon match but I took a lot from it.

'We don't have anything to prove. The bottom line is that we are both competitors, we both want to do the best we can. We both want to be No.1.

We're both of an age where no-one makes decisions for us.' There had been speculation that controversial father Richard had somehow dictated proceedings on Centre Court last year and again when the pair were due to meet at Indian Wells in March.

Venus withdrew just 10 minutes before the final claiming injury.

The angry crowd booed Serena when she appeared on court and again at the victory ceremony.

Richard Williams revealed that he would not attend tonight's final, their sixth meeting in a series Venus leads 4-1. 'It will be like a Roman amphitheatre, like Alexander the Great,' he said. 'I am not going to watch in those circumstances.' Ominously, he also disclosed that Serena had been suffering from a bad ankle and a sore back before her demolition of Hingis.

He also said Venus was nursing an injured knee as well as a cold.

There was not much sign of either being detrimental to her form as she recovered from 1-4 down in the first set to beat Jennifer Capriati 6-4, 6-2 in a match full of errors. …

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