The Joe & Hil Follies

By Goldberg, Danny | The Nation, September 17, 2001 | Go to article overview

The Joe & Hil Follies


Goldberg, Danny, The Nation


Two of the most famous figures in the Democratic Party, Senators Joseph Lieberman and Hillary Clinton, have introduced the Media Marketing Accountability Act of 2001, which, among other things, would make it illegal to market or promote adult-rated rap and rock-and-roll albums to kids under 17 and would empower the Federal Trade Commission to decide which R-rated films may be marketed to minors.

In April, Senator Clinton said, "If you label something as inappropriate for children and then go out and target it to children, you are engaging in false and deceptive advertising." And this summer Democrats, occasionally joined by some Republicans, have browbeaten entertainment-industry leaders at Congressional hearings, accusing them of evading the rating system and selling salacious material to young people. But the R rating on films doesn't mean kids under 17 shouldn't see them; it means they shouldn't see them without an adult. Many parents want their kids to see such R-rated films as Billy Elliot and Erin Brockovich. As for records, the "parental advisory" sticker informs the buyer that the record contains profanity, but it does not have an age recommendation.

Lieberman disingenuously says, "We're not asking the FTC to regulate content in any way, or even to make judgments about what products are appropriate for children." But that's precisely what his radical bill does. It empowers the FTC to "establish the criteria" for new ratings for records and films, and would legally require record companies and film studios to create and implement "an age-based rating or labeling system." Marketing would be deemed to be targeting minors if "the Commission determines that the advertising or marketing is otherwise directed or targeted to minors." With the FTC defining marketing to minors on the basis of FTC-mandated ratings criteria, backed by the crippling financial penalties for "unfair or deceptive acts or practices," it would be able to decide which music and movies could be mass-marketed and thus, by and large, which ones would be released. Lieberman and Clinton apparently believe that federal bureaucrats are the ideal arbiters of the appropriateness of entertainment for teenagers. Lieberman told Inside.com, "We know the difference between Schindler's List and Saving Private Ryan and some of the slasher flicks that are aimed at teenage boys. That's a decision best left to the administrative agency."

Two days before the legislation was introduced, the FTC issued a surreal report that criticized record companies for advertising stickered albums on the World Wrestling Federation TV show SmackDown! because 36 percent of its audience is under 18. So according to the FTC it's OK for younger teens to watch guys knocking the living daylights out of each other, but it's not OK to sell rap music to those same kids! Not surprisingly, more than 70 percent of the albums the FTC monitored were by African-American artists. (The FTC also included the rock band Rage Against the Machine, whose lyrics are frequently political, on the list. …

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