Terror in America: Where Is My Arab Bagel Man?; Warwick University Student Almu Cros Writes from New York

The Birmingham Post (England), September 14, 2001 | Go to article overview

Terror in America: Where Is My Arab Bagel Man?; Warwick University Student Almu Cros Writes from New York


Byline: Almu Cros

I went all the way to the Bronx in the hope that at least that part of New York which is outside Manhattan would be okay, but the zoo was closed, too.

So I had to content myself with a few ducks in a river next to the entrance to the zoo, not exactly exotic but different from the cement jungle I have been in for the past few days.

There are still policemen everywhere, even army officers which makes you feel like you are on the set of Air Force One or Mars Attacks. People generally calm and still very quiet.

Today I saw most people wear sunglasses - maybe to hide their faces as emotions are taking their toll.

I spent an hour chatting to police officers at the end of 42nd Street.

Officers Parrin and Almonte were really sweet to talk to me, I was quite blunt and told them I am just bored and stuck in this city. The train stations are still closed, so no chance of a day trip to New Jersey.

The conversation with the two officers was really interesting. Parrin wanted me to ask if there should be a poll among the British people to see what they think. Should the towers be re-built or should there be a memorial instead?

My reaction first was 'no you cannot build anything on top of that, it is a cemetery, they will never get all human remains out of there, a memorial is better'.

Another officer said: 'No, we have to rebuild them because otherwise 'they' win, and these towers are part of NY, they are a symbol of America. …

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