LETTERS: Your Views Special American Attacks

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), September 19, 2001 | Go to article overview

LETTERS: Your Views Special American Attacks


Silence spoke volumes

DURING this last week, we have seen on the television some appalling scenes in America, and it has affected the whole world.

At our very small parent and toddler group, at the Salvation Army in Stoke, one of the mums requested that we hold the three minutes' silence that was being observed throughout the nation.

It was very moving. Babies cannot be told to be quiet - yet they were - not a sound was heard. It was as though even they knew what the minutes were about.

Margaret Parkinson, Villiers Street, Stoke.

. . . NO-ONE can condone the loss of so many lives, and the grief to everyone concerned, but why did it happen?

Why are there so many poor countries?

Religion, politics, unproductive earth, poverty and subsequently poor education can all take the blame, alongside the human race!

As a national serviceman in the early 50's, I passed through Palestine, Pakistan, India etc. and to this day I have never forgotten the squalor and poverty to be found there.

My first overseas training depot was in Fan Ling, China, another very poor country, but they had paddy fields to grow rice and survive on.

The children were often hungry, but still had beautiful smiles. Female foetuses could be seen in the paddy fields, dead, because they were less productive than male children.

This I believe is the kind of poverty that caused the American atrocities. Five thousand people are believed to have lost their lives.

The Pakistan government official stated that six million Iraqis died in the Gulf War.

I wonder how many Roman Catholics and Protestants have died in Northern Ireland, and all these people are supposed to be Christians.

I am afraid we human beings have an awful lot to answer for.

R J Thompson, Hermes Crescent, Henley Green.

. . . REGARDLESS of any faith, the World Trade Centre bombing is inexcusable.

But I cannot bear the thought of a world war because of a fanatical minority.

If America is as devout as it claims, perhaps it should check the wisdom of "our" Bible.

I use the word "our" guardedly as I am not a practising Christian but I am part of the same world.

So please, Mr President, before you exact a revenge on innocents along with the guilty, think about Genesis 18:23 - 32 for the sake of all mankind.

Jacqueline Bates, Newmarket Close, Alderman's Green.

. . .WHILE reading your coverage of the horrifying events in New York on September 11, I was dismayed to see the most distasteful photograph entitled "Horror Leap" which you had chosen to publish.

This is a photograph of a human being forced to cut short his own life, in sheer terror of what he could see was about to happen to him.

I am particularly saddened as I respect much of the work you do in our local community.

Catherine Dagnan, Evesham Walk, Cannon Park.

. . .NO FAITH of any kind that looks to a God of love would see to fit to such an act of mass murder as was witnessed in America.

This is a direct result of extreme evil, and as in this case the devil always comes in disguise.

Even in the aftermath, the faceless coward has not showed itself for it knows what will follow.

The attack on the USA took place on September 11 or 9/11.

In the book of Revelation 9:11 it says: ". . . and they had over them a king, the angel of the abyss; his name in Hebrew is Abaddon (devil); and in Greek Apollyon (Destroyer); in Latin he has the name Exterminans. …

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