CR Reviews Your School's Web Site

Curriculum Review, October 2001 | Go to article overview

CR Reviews Your School's Web Site


This month: Cuyahoga Heights Schools, Cuyahoga Heights, Ohio

URL: http://www.cuyhts.k12.oh.us

Comments: "I am sending our school's Web site for your review," writes Jim Morrow, who then offers a list of "what I think is special about our site":

1. Layout

2. User-friendly: Visitors can use the headings on the left side of the page, or can use the headings in the center of the home page.

3. Highlights student art work

4. Under the Co-Curricular heading, the Web pages for the co-curricular are being developed by our students in the Web Design class

5. History of the school and community

6. Reference to the national park corridor in the district.

7. A link to the required 5th-grade Web page project

8. Staff development link to the MySchoolOnline.com link, which hosts our workshop site

9. The usage of cancellations.com for updated information on school closings.

10. Links to our communities

11. District information

12. A Site Map that is easy to follow.

Review: Jim's no David Letterman--after all, it's supposed to be a Top 10 List! Seriously, though, if we had sat Mr. Morrow down before the district launched this site and asked him what he'd like to see there, he likely would have brought up many of the items that ended up on his list. In the salad days of the Web economy boom, organization leaders in every sector could be heard to say, "We need an Internet presence!" Often, not a lot of thought went into the purpose of such a site, or even the real need for one. It was just important not to be left behind. …

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