Muslims Denounce Terrorism, Urge Americans to `Stand Together'

By Donovan, Gill | National Catholic Reporter, September 21, 2001 | Go to article overview

Muslims Denounce Terrorism, Urge Americans to `Stand Together'


Donovan, Gill, National Catholic Reporter


Following the devastating acts of terrorism committed Sept. 11 against the United States, Islamic organizations in Los Angeles and elsewhere denounced the attacks and called for all Americans to "stand together" during this time of crisis.

Mahmoud Abdel-Baset, religious coordinator for the Islamic Center of Southern California, extended his "condolences and sympathies for all those who were touched by the terrorist attacks. However," he told The Tidings, the Los Angeles archdiocesan newspaper, "the agony the whole nation is going through is beyond the pain of any one individual group."

The Muslim Public Affairs Council in Washington made a similar statement: "We feel that our country, the United States, is under attack.... We offer our resources and resolve to help the victims of these intolerable acts, and we pray to God to protect and bless America."

"I hope we would not degenerate to stereotyping people and blaming everyone of a certain background for these incidents," said Fr. …

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