Men in White Coats Set Us Visitors

By Ramsay, Gordon | Daily Mail (London), October 6, 2001 | Go to article overview

Men in White Coats Set Us Visitors


Ramsay, Gordon, Daily Mail (London)


Byline: GORDON RAMSAY

THE guillotine has dropped and there is blood everywhere. The perennial flow of tourists from the great market of the United States of America has been shut off as certainly as if we had entered a cold war with our starred and striped friends.

I understand the State Department in the U.S. has warned its nationals not to travel on the assumption that if they do and a preemptive strike takes place, they could be stranded in Europe. Now there's a thought.

So what would a stranded U.S. citizen do with himself in Britain? Clearly it is a time to experience something that cannot be done back home.

The first stop is Lord's cricket ground. We are going to teach you about cricket, a sport as popular in America as Outer Mongolian hopscotch. There are six balls

to an over, two innings in test cricket, a silly mid-off and a long stop and two men in white coats who are in charge.

When you have had enough, you can declare and go and have some tea.

Cheering is frowned upon and the match can take as long as five days.

Enough of that. I'm hungry.

Let's go up to Scotland (no, the Scots aren't great cricketers) and I'll show you how to fish for wild salmon.

No barbecuing, no frying and definitely no broiling. A gentle poaching in a proper fish kettle is all you require to give the most beautiful taste and colour.

Afterwards, go north to Inverness and learn how to pronounce your adopted language. Control the vowels and remember that consonants, when brought into conversation, can give it a whole new sound. Nowhaaaaimeen?

And since you are here, why not take a look at the Royal Family? By this I don't mean stand like a gawping penguin outside Buckingham Palace. Get to Wine sale was know the real goings-on.

Read the Court Circular and the society pages.

Come to think of it, read any paper to get a fuller insight into the ascending and descending order of the Royal Court.

Observe the general throat-cutting activities that each member indulges in and count the times that you see a yellow, blue or red outfit with swinging handbag and a lady-in-waiting to carry the 300 or so bouquets that have just been handed over. Find out what threatens HRH when we ask God to save her.

Just before you go, grab a map and learn that these much-loved isles are made up of different countries each with their own language - albeit faded in parts - and their own funny ways.

England alone i s not Great Britain - and the Republic of Ireland is not part of the United Kingdom.

Remember the last bit in particular.

Wine sale was simply tasteless IT'S a fact that the most important item for sale in my restaurant is a bottle of wine - so I could hardly miss the fact that this week there was an auction of a million bottles.

Wine.com had gone down the tubes after popping [pound]135million of shareholders' funds and this was salvage time.The anticipated sale proceeds amounted to [pound]6.75million - an average price of [pound]6.75 a bottle.

Petrus 1970 sold at, well, I'm not going to tell you because I am too upset.

Chateau d'Yquem 1921 went for [pound]1,350, which is slightly lower than the bottle on my wine list. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Men in White Coats Set Us Visitors
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.