DON'T FEELSORRY FOR Y VAIN,PITY DAISY; Why Let Being a Mum Get in the Way of a Good Story, Ms Ridley?

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), October 12, 2001 | Go to article overview

DON'T FEELSORRY FOR Y VAIN,PITY DAISY; Why Let Being a Mum Get in the Way of a Good Story, Ms Ridley?


Byline: Joan Burnie

THE Taliban stoned and paraded three male reporters through the streets of Jalalabad when they were caught illegally entering Afghanistan.

No-one deserves such barbarity. But I hope the Foreign Office chucks the book at Yvonne Ridley, this daft woman who thought all she had to do to cover herself in journalistic glory was to put on a burqa and cross into Taliban territory.

The fact that Ridley didn't speak the language, had blonde hair and blue eyes and no papers meant she was bound to get lifted.

Perhaps that was her cunning plan. Maybe she thought bin Laden would be so seduced by her beauty and bravery he would either make her his next wife or, better yet, meekly allow her to arrest him and hand him over to the allies.

Then we had her equally dumb and deluded mother claiming it was all wrong to start the bombing before her precious Yvonne got out.

Did she really expect the entire operation to be postponed because of one journalist on a junket?

There is also Ridley's own daughter, Daisy. Lovely child, but ruthlessly and cynically used by everyone as the one reason her mother must be released.

Shame Ms Ridley - and maybe her employers - didn't think about young Daisy before she decided to go walkabout in a war zone.

To hell, of course, with everyone else's children - those who are starving in the refugee camps or others who have lost both parents, not because they deliberately put themselves in danger, but because they just happened to be in the wrong place or the wrong side at the wrong time. …

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