Limit Immigration, Not Civil Liberties

By Roberts, Paul Craig | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 12, 2001 | Go to article overview

Limit Immigration, Not Civil Liberties


Roberts, Paul Craig, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Paul Craig Roberts

A tragedy for thousands of Americans, the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the U.S. were a boon for Eurostatists, Eurocrats and other assorted architects of a European state. The superstatists quickly put their own spin on the attacks, arguing that their success proves the impotence and pointlessness of national sovereignty.

As British European Union advocate Graham Watson put it, "The fig leaf of national sovereignty serves only to hide the impotence of nation-states." If Europeans want security from terrorists, they must find it in the centralization of power in the European state.

This theme has been waiting for lift off ever since, five years ago, a European Commission planning document concluded: "It will be difficult to achieve political union [of sovereign countries] without there being the perception of an external political threat. A terrorist outrage would contribute to the perception of an external political threat."

Although the attacks of Sept. 11 were committed against the U.S., Eurostatists have seized on the attack to call for a European arrest warrant, European criminal law based on the Napoleonic model, and the creation of a centralized agency with the combined powers of the FBI and CIA.

These items were on the EU agenda for "judicial integration," but in the aftermath of the September attack on the World Trade Center they have become part of the war against terrorism. Opposition to these measures is fading as no one wants to be accused of being soft on terrorism.

These developments have severe implications for habeas corpus and the English common law tradition. A Greek or Spanish prosecutor would be able to arrest an Englishman without having to meet English standards for extradition.

As well, the EU has defined terrorism broadly enough to include those who oppose increased powers for the EU. Ambrose Evans-Pritchard of the London Telegraph wagers that the EU's anti-terrorism language "will before the decade is out be used to charge a British citizen engaged in political dissent against the EU."

The English spent 1,000 years making law a shield of the people rather than a weapon in the hands of government. Now this historic achievement is to be vitiated for the sake of "anti-terrorism" measures. …

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