Rights Panel Keeps Hot Line Data from Justice

By Miller, Steve | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 13, 2001 | Go to article overview

Rights Panel Keeps Hot Line Data from Justice


Miller, Steve, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Steve Miller

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights refused this week to provide the Justice Department with requested information from a hot line established for Arabs and Muslims to report hate crimes and discrimination in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

The eight-member commission, which established the toll-free number Sept. 17 for Middle Easterners to report incidents of ethnic intimidation, hate crimes and other civil rights infractions, has been asked repeatedly by the Justice Department to forward such cases for investigation.

"The fact that you continue to refuse to forward to this division or the civil rights unit of the FBI even basic information about the reports of hate crimes and other unlawful discrimination your agency is receiving is particularly troubling in view of the obvious seriousness and urgency of these matters," said Assistant Attorney General Ralph Boyd Jr., in a letter this week to commission staff director Les Jin.

The commission gathered yesterday for its monthly meeting, with the panel's leader defending the hot line's concept regardless of its results.

"The hot line doesn't hold itself out as a problem solver," said commission Chairman Mary Frances Berry. "We have made that very clear. And everyone that I've spoken to is very grateful. I think we ought to be proud to be doing this, rather than consider if it is helping anybody."

Terri Dickerson, director of the commission's office for civil rights evaluation, said at the meeting that hot line operators "encourage" callers to contact law enforcement.

"We always see if there is any way we can further assist, or see if there is another referral we can make," Miss Dickerson told the commissioners. She added that some of the callers started at the local police level and, unsatisfied, turned to the commission.

"It is an information service, not a problem-solving service, then?" Commissioner Christopher Edley asked.

Miss Berry also said that the information would not be valuable to law enforcement because callers can remain anonymous. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Rights Panel Keeps Hot Line Data from Justice
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.