How Safe Is North Wales from Terrorists?; SPECIAL REPORT

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), October 16, 2001 | Go to article overview

How Safe Is North Wales from Terrorists?; SPECIAL REPORT


Byline: Hywel Trewyn

SECURITY has been tightened at nuclear power stations and other potential targets in Wales as part of measures to protect them against possible attacks by terrorists.

Fears of security breaches in North Wales were heightened after a 56-year-old man was arrested in Bangor last Thursday under the Prevention of Terrorism Act. The unnamed man was questioned by detectives and released without charge yesterday. On Friday, Assembly Member Alison Halford called for anti-aircraft guns to be placed at nuclear power stations in North Wales to defend them against terrorist attacks.

The former Assistant Chief Constable of Merseyside claimed Wylfa and Trawsfynydd power stations could become terrorist targets. The Labour AM for Delyn said it would be fairly difficult to prevent attacks on the power stations.

She added: "When you've got an aircraft full of aviation fuel, that's just a flying bomb. Let's also remember that when you have fanatics . . . however careful the security, it's very, very difficult to stop such things happening. But let's look on the bright side, Wylfa and the other power station are built to a very high specification. Enormous strength.

"It would be possible to put anti-aircraft guns to shoot down anything - and let's hope that it doesn't happen - but you can get anti-aircraft guns that shoot down anything that looks really sinister."

In the meantime, the state of emergency at Wylfa on Anglesey has been raised from "black special" alert to "amber". Measures to protect the former nuclear power station at Trawsfynydd - which is now going through the decommissioning process - also have ben stepped up. As a potential target, the nuclear reprocessing plant at Sellafield, formerly known as Windscale and which deals with spent fuel from Wylfa, is not too far away from North Wales.

The Secretary of State for Trade and Industry is the Government sponsor, and part-owner , of the civil nuclear industry and the Cabinet office has set up a dedicated unit which is advising local authorities on security.

But BNFL, which is responsible for 15 nuclear sites in the UK, including Wylfa and Trawsfynydd, refuses to say what kind of measures are being taken. Its spokesman, David Cartwright, said: "As regards security, we follow the same guidelines as all Government locations, including military ones and the BBC. They all follow what the Government advises. We're in a state of alert or vigilance at all locations. All sites with nuclear stations are on alert. It was a "black special" state of alert but now we're on "amber alert" throughout the British Isles. But I'm not going to say what that means. We have to keep that quiet.

"The sites which are under alert include nuclear sites such as Sellafield and nuclear stations such as Trawsfynydd and Wylfa. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How Safe Is North Wales from Terrorists?; SPECIAL REPORT
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.