Grades 8-12 Investigating Community Preparedness

Curriculum Review, November 2001 | Go to article overview

Grades 8-12 Investigating Community Preparedness


The Federal Emergency Management Agency has developed a lesson plan that enables students to look at how their community is preparing for possible disasters and then allows a simulation that demonstrates how difficult handling disasters can be. The exercise involves such skills as: planning, interviewing, writing, public speaking and analysis and problem solving. In the wake of the recent terrorist attacks, it might also serve to help the students feel safer knowing that many groups in the community stand ready to deal with various disasters, both natural and manmade.

Focus Question: How would our community cope in the event of a natural disaster? Who are the people most responsible for our community's survival and recovery?

All communities are subject to fire and flood. Others face such natural hazards as tornadoes, hurricanes or earthquakes. Any natural disaster can impact many people in the community, and all communities plan for such inevitabilities.

All of the following people and more may play a role in your community's disaster preparedness planning and response:

Mayor or City Administrator, City Manager, Public Information Officer, Chief of Police, Fire Chief, Emergency Management Coordinator, Superintendent of Schools, School District Risk Manger, City Building Code Inspector, City Council Members, City Geologist, City Planner, Coordinator of Roads and Transportation, Director of Public Health, Director of Public Works, Superintendent of the Sewage Plant, Superintendent of the Water Department, Electric Company Emergency Officer, Telephone Company Emergency Coordinator, Hospital Safety and Security Manager, Manager of Community's Voluntary Organization Chapter (such as Red Cross).

Determine which individuals are most crucial to your community and/or to the specific natural hazard most common in your area. Add individuals who might be missing from the list. Assign students to contact the individuals and set up interviews. Each student will interview an individual to learn what roles he or she will play in the community's emergency/disaster preparedness plan. The interviews could include these questions:

* What are the current emergency plans for this area? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Grades 8-12 Investigating Community Preparedness
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.