DIVISION REPORT Business Education Division

Techniques, October 2001 | Go to article overview

DIVISION REPORT Business Education Division


Know Your VP

Dianna Carpenter has been a member of ACTE for a number of years and was elected to a three-year term as vice president of the Business Education Division in 2000. Teaching was her goal from very early in her life--though the choice of teaching assignments changed. Early in her college career, she realized that business education was her destiny. Carpenter has taught in Roane County, W. Va., her entire career.

Becoming involved in professional associations was a natural progression for her; she is a member of the National Business Education Association and participates in many other events in her community. Being the head junior sponsor in charge of the prom at her high school as well as Future Business Leaders of America advisor are activities that also keep her very busy.

The issue in education that concerns Carpenter the most is the future of business education with the looming teacher shortage.

Thanks to Abigail Reynolds

Abby Reynolds is business education supervisor in the state of West Virginia. She has been deeply involved in directing the activities of the national ACTE since 1995, when she was elected Business Education Division president. Her years of involvement as vice president of the Business Education Division began in Denver, Colo., and one of the activities that was completed during her term in office was the beginning of the office of president-elect. The proposal was made during the term of office of Charlotte Coomer, and after Coomer and Reynolds began the process, it was presented to the board then passed at the ACTE convention in Cincinnati, Ohio. Reynolds is very proud of this accomplishment. When asked about the office of president-elect she said, "It is a valuable training mechanism for the association. It allows and encourages the president-elect to become acclimated to the affiliates (NACEBE, NATEBE, and NASBE)."

Another of the accomplishments she was proud to discuss was helping to restructure the program format for the business education division.

Prior to the end of her term as vice president, Reynolds was elected president-elect of ACTE. When she completed her vice presidency, she went right into the office of president-elect beginning in 1998. One of the greatest satisfactions for Reynolds during her three years as president-elect, president, and past president was being part of the search committee for the new executive director, and she feels secure that the new director will be a welcome addition to the ACTE office. …

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