Do the Dunes This Fall in Porter County, Ind

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 21, 2001 | Go to article overview

Do the Dunes This Fall in Porter County, Ind


Byline: Mike Michaelson

It's the variety of colors that captivates at the Indiana Dunes. Spread out before you like a Navajo blanket is dark chocolate wet sand, beige-colored dry sand and the variegated shades of blue in the broad expanses of lake. A purple ribbon of haze floats on the horizon and white cirrus clouds drift across a blue sky.

After a heart-pounding, leg-wearying climb to a high dune, you spread out a beach towel in a quiet clearing. Surrounded by the green leaves of sumac and struggling strands of dune grass, you seem a thousand miles from Gary's belching steel mills and the concrete-and-steel canyons of Chicago that lie less than an hour's ride away. For a brief moment, all seems right with the world. Only jet contrails high in the sky remind you of the real world.

As Carl Sandburg observed, "Those dunes are to the Midwest what the Grand Canyon is to Arizona and Yosemite to California."

Autumn in Duneland is a time to visit apple orchards and boutique wineries, to hike those wonderful sand dunes in national and state preserves and relax at a resort and spa. Porter County's system of bike trails has nine loops that follow secondary roads through picturesque countryside that includes farmland, lakes, meadows, parks and sleepy towns. You'll find plenty of antique shops and galleries to browse, and some good eateries of both the down-home and upscale varieties.

Stay at Indian Oak Resort & Spa, where from the rustic balcony of your room you can watch migrating waterfowl and a resident population of Canada geese and mallards on a small private lake. The spa offers a wide range of health and beauty options, including water aerobics in an indoor pool, massages (including hot-stone therapy), facials and a variety of body wraps. Some guest rooms have whirlpools and/or fireplaces. The inn, just two miles from the dunes, makes an ideal headquarters for exploring Porter County. Outdoor activities include hiking and cross-country skiing on adjoining trails that wind past towering oaks on 100 acres of woodland, plus ice-skating.

Family-owned Dune Ridge Winery, opened in 1998, operates in a 1940s-era motor lodge converted into a wine cellar, tasting room and a blending and bottling facility. Located on a wooded acre near Indiana Dunes State Park, the winery offers red and white wines including chardonnay, vidal blanc, white zinfandel, muscat, chancellor, riesling and cherry wine.

Anderson's Orchard & Winery, a 40-acre family farm dating back to 1927, started out as a small roadside market. More than 5,000 fruit trees planted on Porter County's highest ridge produce more than 20 varieties of cooking and eating apples. Although a newcomer to wine making, it already has won awards for its sparkling champagne-style wines. It offers a pumpkin patch, homemade jams and jellies and baked goods. It also has cross-country ski trails.

Large expanses of "dune country" are protected by 2,182-acre Indiana Dunes State Park and the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, a federally administered preserve containing about 15,000 acres. Together, these areas contain some of the most diverse flora and fauna in the Midwest.

They also provide a wide range of highly popular interpretive programs, ranging from hikes with a naturalist to explore the semi- arid desert-like environments found in the dunes, to a video presentation about edible wild foods. Listen to the leaves rustle overhead as you journey with a ranger on the Dune Ridge Trail under the fall foliage. Kid-friendly, fun programs include beach-blanket bingo and scavenger hunts that teach participants about the unique habitats found in and around the dunes.

A popular program is a tour of Pinhook Bog, 14,000 years in the making and a remnant of the last ice age. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Do the Dunes This Fall in Porter County, Ind
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.