WAR ON TERROR: OUTRAGE IN CITY: US Nazi Groups Linked to Anthrax

The Mirror (London, England), October 29, 2001 | Go to article overview

WAR ON TERROR: OUTRAGE IN CITY: US Nazi Groups Linked to Anthrax


Byline: PAUL BYRNE

NEO-NAZIS in the US could be behind the anthrax attacks which have terrorised America.

Investigators believe white supremacists rather than Islamic militants could be responsible for the letters containing deadly spores.

And the security services say they are closing in on suspects.

A justice department source said: "We are zeroing in on a number of hate groups.

"There are a number of strong leads and some people we know well that we are looking at.

The US neo-Nazi right has bred numerous terrorists like Timothy McVeigh, motivated by his loathing of the government to destroy a federal office building in Oklahoma with a bomb that killed 168 people. He was executed in June.

The source added: "These are groups organised into militia and survivalist movements.

"They pull out of society and take to the hills to make war on the government and they will support anyone else doing the same."

"We have to presume that their opposition to government is just as virulent as that of the Islamic terrorists, if not as accomplished."

The investigation is also looking at links between neo-Nazis and Muslim extremists, who are united in their hatred of Israel and Jews.

A sick message on the neo-Nazi National Alliance website after World Trade Center attack read: "The enemy of our enemy is, for now at least, our friend. …

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