Today's Science Powers Tomorrow's Agriculture

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), October 31, 2001 | Go to article overview

Today's Science Powers Tomorrow's Agriculture


AS recent graduates, Elizabeth Magowan and Andrew Bell, are well aware, agriculture is fundamental to a successful economy.

Today's agriculture is continually changing in line with world market competition.

New sustainable practices, tighter management of inputs contributing to farm outputs and new science-driven approaches to various aspects of production all mean that today's science is tomorrows agriculture.

It is hardly surprising then that education is essential if today's agriculturalists are to cope successfully with the future.

The BSc Agricultural Science degree offered by Queen's School of Agriculture & Food Science gives students that necessary edge, together with the opportunity to achieve a Double Honours degree within four years.

This unique degree programme is possible by studying either Biochemistry, Biological Sciences or Chemistry for the first three years. After graduating with a degree in one of the latter, students continue with a fourth year in Agriculture and graduate with a BAgr Honours degree in Agricultural Science. With the opportunity to leave with a science degree after the first three years, students have the choice to follow other pathways if they wish or to continue to attain the BAgr Honours degree in Agricultural Science.

As Andrew and Elizabeth know, this dynamic course provides training and skills not only in an applied science field, but also in the industry of agriculture itself. Simultaneously, the course intercalates excellence between the two subject matters in terms of better scientific approach, thinking and method. Andrew and Elizabeth discovered first hand that the knowledge gained through their primary Biochemistry degrees developed their thinking to become more flexible and adaptable towards their secondary degree in Agricultural Science. …

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