Inmate Transportation: Safety Is the Priority

By Jackson, Carlos; Rion, Sharon Johnson | Corrections Today, July 2001 | Go to article overview

Inmate Transportation: Safety Is the Priority


Jackson, Carlos, Rion, Sharon Johnson, Corrections Today


Sheriffs, jail administrators, police chiefs, public safety directors and wardens share a common challenge -- the safe, secure and humane transfer of hundreds of thousands of inmates per year. Although inmate transportation has been a part of corrections and law enforcement since the inception of America's criminal justice system, the demand to move so many, so often and so far, has increased in the last 10 to 15 years, thus, further challenging existing resources to meet the need, often instead of, or in competition with, other equally essential operations.

Prior to 1990, few state departments of correction had centralized transportation units. Similarly, county sheriffs, local law enforcement and detention personnel did not incorporate specialized transportation units or transportation overtime as major budget items. However, units and overtime now are in the budget, and the U.S. Marshals Service has established its own air service to accommodate the increased demand.

While there is not an easy solution for balancing agency goals and objectives with diminishing resources, there are some fundamentals to be considered in establishing an inmate transportation operation, program or unit. Whether one is moving a detainee from the local jail across town for a court appearance, transferring an inmate from one prison to another, or extraditing a fugitive cross-country, the basic principles of good security and inmate management apply.

Policies and Procedures

It is hard to imagine any agency establishing and maintaining fundamental security and offender management without first developing a game plan. Policy and procedures must be developed with and coordinated among all principals and agencies involved. Think of the challenges federal, state and local officials face when transporting high-profile in-mates. Also consider the routine movement of large numbers of inmates across jurisdictional lines by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, U.S. Marshals Service and private inmate transportation companies. Such work is not accomplished by happenstance.

However simple a move may appear, each requires planning. An established game plan, known to and complied by all concerned, will ensure an assessment of a potential escape or disruptive behavior, reduce possible miscommunication between staff and should circumvent inefficient time in court, missed medical appointments and overtime.

There are innumerable factors to be considered when moving inmates outside correctional facilities. While the scope and complexity of some factors of transport are relative to the number of agencies involved, jurisdictions to be traversed and miles traveled, the fundamentals are the same. Therefore, it is not possible to ensure that adequate equipment, staff, inter/intra-agency communication and information exchange, subject-specific training and applicable regulations have been addressed without developing policies and procedures.

Communication

Communication between agencies and staff is challenging. Needless to say, that difficulty is magnified as agencies involved in the transportation of one or more inmates increase. Consequently, when multiple agencies -- courts, doctors' offices, hospitals, other correctional facilities and law enforcement agencies -- are involved, it is essential to share and confirm information to eliminate inefficiency and risky events.

Lines of communication must be established and shared with all applicable agencies and individuals. Staff members from each organization exchanging information about all or specified aspects of the transport need to know the game plan and work accordingly. If staff on one shift initiate the move, but staff on the next shift process the inmate back into the facility, all necessary information must be shared between personnel on both shifts. Likewise, when reception center staff members use a centralized transportation unit to initiate moving an inmate to another facility, they should provide transportation officers with appropriate information and inform staff at the receiving facility. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Inmate Transportation: Safety Is the Priority
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.