VNR Update: Fact versus Fiction

Public Relations Journal, December 1989 | Go to article overview

VNR Update: Fact versus Fiction


VNR Update Facts versus Fiction

Ask video news relase distributors and producers what issues are affecting their businesses and their clients, and you may be surprised at the frankness of their replies. PRJ did just that recently, in the course of gathering information for our annual VNR Update reference table--a handy guide to the methods and prices of VNR suppliers that starts on page 25.

First, here's a summary of their comments on the status of the medium.

The people who make a living at distributing and/or producing VNRs have seen their medium become recognized and widely used as a valuable public relations tool, particularly during the past few years. But they're also realists about the capabilities of VNRs--perhaps more realistic than some of their clients.

They readily acknowledge, for instance, that a big news story will always run on television newscasts, whether the report is generated by a new organization or taken in whole or in part from a VNR. No doubt about it: A VNR covering a hot topic can reach huge audiences--it it's well produced and properly distributed and promoted. In August, for example, when the media hype on the "war on drugs" was at its apex, a VNR showing Colombia's President, Virgilio Barco, issuing a stiff warning to drug traffickers in his country was reportedly seen by 75 million TV viewers. In 1988, a VNR about Drexel Burnham Lambert's agreement with the U.S. Attorney's office concerning junk-bond king Michael Milken reached an estimated audience of 80 million.

But BVR pros will also tell you that most VNRs distributed to TV stations do not contain inherently big news stories, and therefore are not necessarily picked up by major networks (or even lots of local stations) or seen by multimillions of people. A more typical BNR does have news or genuine feature value, but most don't cause news editors to cry out, "What a story!" For VNR suppliers--and for public relations firms--who produce quality products and use smart distribution methods, clients with unrealistic expectations are a continuing problem. "If you can reach an audience of three to four million viewers--that's Nielsen or Arbitron viewers, not some pipe dream of viewers, but numbers of people who actually watch local news and talk shows--you've done a good job," says one major supplier. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

VNR Update: Fact versus Fiction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.