An Institutional View of Electronic Records Management: Hospitals & Teleradiology

By Yakel, Elizabeth | Information Management, January 2001 | Go to article overview

An Institutional View of Electronic Records Management: Hospitals & Teleradiology


Yakel, Elizabeth, Information Management


Electronic records and recordkeeping systems are ubiquitous in most organizations. Only recently, though, have records professionals begun to realize their full power, potential, and uses. Electronic records have the power to capture ideas, notes, and communications that were previously invisible or ephemeral events such as fleeting face-to-face or telephone conversations.

Implementations of electronic recordkeeping systems can: (1) provide more people with greater access to information and (2) give them the possibility of putting disparate information together in new, innovative ways -- in essence to create new knowledge (Davenport and Prusak 1998). These two factors affect the appraisal of previously established records series, the way these series function in the workplace, and the expectations for the use of these records by different individuals. The legal and economic implications of such changes are only now emerging.

As more and more paper records take electronic form, records managers need to reassess and reanalyze the records with a careful examination of the new organizational communication patterns and functions that electronic recordkeeping systems support. This article examines the trends mentioned and cites as examples emerging applications in the medical arena, particularly in the area of radiology. It is founded on a research study at a large tertiary care medical center (Yakel 1997).

Traditional Radiological Records: The Generation Processes

Radiologists create and interpret images derived from a variety of modalities: radiography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and computed tomography (CT). These radiological processes of image creation and interpretation are bounded by the generation of records. A clinician writes a radiological requisition to begin the process; a signed radiologist's report signals its completion.

The most common records associated with radiology are the anatomical images themselves and the radiologist's report of findings -- the interpretation of those images. Radiological processes, though, encompass a number of records-creating events resulting in the creation of a variety of types of documentation.

These documents include a requisition for radiological services, scheduling calendars, the actual images generated, various forms of the report that may range from indexes to images to be viewed, notes in preliminary books, an audiotape of the report by the radiologist, the preliminary -- or unapproved -- version of the transcribed report, and the final, approved report.

Additionally, other types of records may also be used to inform the radiological interpretation, including the medical record, particularly any previous radiological images and reports. The radiological images and final reports are the focus of this article.

Although numerous doctors' offices have access to a basic radiography (X-ray) machine and perhaps ultrasound technology, these images still must be professionally interpreted by radiologists, who are often associated with area hospitals. Patients requiring imaging techniques, such as a MRI or CT scan, must go to a hospital or special center for these tests. Image capture, then, takes place at diverse locations, and in the latter scenario, the clinician does not have ready or easy access to the images and must rely primarily on the report when making a diagnosis.

In many hospitals, the radiological report has traditionally been created orally using a telephone dictation system. Clinicians would either telephone into the system to listen to a verbal, preliminary, and unauthorized report, or they could wait until the dictation was transcribed and then access an approved, written description and analysis of radiological images.

If clinicians wanted to tie the written report to the images, clinicians often had to request the images to study them in conjunction with the written report. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

An Institutional View of Electronic Records Management: Hospitals & Teleradiology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.