Pizza Pizzazz

By Lyons, Charlotte | Ebony, October 1989 | Go to article overview

Pizza Pizzazz


Lyons, Charlotte, Ebony


Pizza Pizzazz

PIZZA is an all-time favorite of most families. The scrumptions flavor of Italian pie appeals to both adults and children. Homemade pizza is more appetizing than pizzeria pizza because you can combine your favorite toppings to reflect your personal tastes. Making pizza at home is convenient and inexpensive, and the whole family can participate in the fun. Thanks to frozen and packaged bread dough, plus jarred and canned pizza or spaghetti sauce, it is simple to prepare.

This month, we feature mouth-watering pizzas for everyone. If you like deep dish pizza, you will want to try Chicago Style or Pan Pizza recipes. For those who want lots of vegetables, we offer an excellent Ratatouille Pizza, or Scallop Vegetable Pizza. Some time-saving pizza recipes are the French Bread Pizza or Stuffed Pizza Pockets. For a marvelous dessert on crust, try Fruit Pizza.

If you find that you have Italian fever tonight, then turn your kitchen into a pizza parlor. It's as easy as making a tempting Pizza with Pizzazz.

PAN PIZZA

1 16-ounce package hot roll mix 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese 1/2 pound Italian Sausage, casing removed and crumbled 1/4 cup chopped onion 1/4 cup chopped green pepper 1 clove garlic, minced 1 16-ounce can tomatoes, cut-up 1/3 cup tomato paste 1 4-ounce can mushroom stems and pieces, drained 1 teaspoon sugar 2 teaspoons Italian seasoning 1/2 teaspoon fennel seed 1 teaspoon salt, optional 2 cups shredded Mozzarella cheese

Prepare hot roll mix according to package directions. Knead and cover. With greased fingers pat dough onto bottom and halfway up sides of greased 15x10x1-inch baking pan. Bake a 375[degrees] oven 20 to 25 minutes. Cook sausage, onion, green pepper and garlic over medium heat in large skillet until meat is brown; drain. Stir in Parmesan cheese, tomatoes, tomato paste, mushrooms, sugar, Italian seasoning, fennel and salt. Spread meat mixture over hot, baked crust. Sprinkle with Mozzarella cheese. Bake 20 to 25 minutes longer. Let stand 5 minutes before cutting.

Yields 8 to 10 servings

FRENCH BREAD PIZZAS

1/2 POUND Italian sausage 1 1-pound loaf french bread 1 6-ounce can Italian seasoned tomato paste 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 cup sliced green pepper 1 cup thinly sliced onions 3/4 cup shredded Mozzarella cheese 1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese

Remove casing. Cook sausage in skillet over medium heat until brown, stirring to crumble. Drain; pat dry with paper towel and set aside.

Slice bread in half lengthwise; place cut side up on a baking sheet. Spread evenly with tomato paste; sprinkle each with 1/2 teaspoon oregano. Top with sausage, green pepper, onion and cheeses. Broil 6 inches from heat 2 minutes or until cheese melts.

Yields 4 servings

RATATOUILLE PIZZA

1 small eggplant (about 1/2 pound) Olive oil 1 pound frozen loaf bread dough, thawed 1 small zucchini, thinly sliced 1 small yellow squash, thinly sliced 1 large tomato, sliced 1 small onion, thinly sliced 1 small green pepper, cut into rings 3/4 cup spaghetti sauce 1 teaspoon dried basil 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1-1/2 cups shredded Mozzarella cheese

Arrange the eggplant slices in one layer on oiled jelly-roll pans and brush lightly with olive oil. Broil the slices under broiler about 2 inches from heat for 4 to 5 minutes or until golden. Turn slices, brush them again lightly with oil; continue broiling 4 to 5 minutes more or until golden.

Lightly brush dough with oil. Cover with waxed paper; allow to stand at room temperature 1 hour. Grease 14-inch pizza pan; sprinkle with cornmeal. Roll out dough to fit pizza pan; press onto bottom and up side of pizza pan. Spread spaghetti sauce evenly over dough. Arrange vegetables on sauce; sprinkle with basil, oregano and garlic powder. Top with Mozzarella cheese. Bake at 350[degrees] 30 to 35 minutes or until golden and vegetables are tender. …

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