Congregations Look to New Security Measures. (News)

The Christian Century, October 24, 2001 | Go to article overview

Congregations Look to New Security Measures. (News)


Across the United States, thousands of houses of worship have beefed up or requested information about security after the possibility of more terrorist attacks--a matter made more urgent after the U.S. began airstrikes against targets in Afghanistan. In particular, some cathedrals and highly visible megachurches as well as large mosques and synagogues have taken extra precautions.

Washington's National Cathedral has been on high alert since September 11. Captain Vince Scola, who commands the cathedral's police force, has increased the staff. His 17 officers now conduct more physical checks of the building and random checks of backpacks and packages. At special events, they use hand-held metal detectors purchased as a direct result of the assaults on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

"I hate to admit it, but we can be a potential target just because of what we represent," Scola said. "The National Cathedral is a church for all people. It's a national treasure. We must maintain that thought and be constantly on alert because the best defense is to be on alert." The cathedral averages between 600 and 800 attendees for weekend services but reaches its 3,200-person capacity during special worship days such as Christmas Eve, Easter and the National Day of Prayer service September 14.

Congregations of all sizes have wanted to learn more. "We've seen an increase in requests," said Jeff Hanna, executive director for the Guide One Center for Risk Management in Des Moines, Iowa, which represents 48,000 houses of worship. "We've sent out our agents and most have reported that their policyholders want to know how to better protect themselves."

Since U.S. and British airstrikes began on October 7 and U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft said days later that general, but credible, domestic threats have been received by federal authorities, officials of the nondenominational Southeast Christian Church in Louisville, Kentucky, said they would continue to reevaluate security. "The main threat now is retaliation on the U.S., whether it be a physical or a biological act," said Ron Aguiar, director of safety and security for the church, which draws an estimated 15,000 churchgoers to its 100-acre campus each weekend.

"If this becomes more and more of a threat, if the FBI raises the bar, then we will do what everybody else does," he said. "We will limit accessibility and add even more security. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Congregations Look to New Security Measures. (News)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.