ADAMHA Budget Stresses Research

The Alcoholism Report, January 1989 | Go to article overview

ADAMHA Budget Stresses Research


ADAMHA Budget Stresses Research

With significant increases requested for NIDA and NIMH research, the overall budget for the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration (ADAMHA), the final Reagan budget reflects the philosophy of its Administrator, Frederick Goodwin, MD, that the agency's "fundamental, defining mission" is research (AR, Sept. 27). This position was affirmed in an HHS budget document which stated that the FY-90 request "emphasizes the Administration's continued resolve to address the biological and behavioral aspects of substance abuse and mental illness. Within this context, ADAMHA's primary focus is research, including the development of new methods to treat both ailments."

ADAMHA is still responsible for the big alcohol, drug abuse and mental health services (ADMS) block grant program, beefed up by the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988, the primary federal service delivery mechanism.

Goodwin has expressed concern about ADAMHA's role in the treatment area, stating that if the agency's "investment in the services arena continues to expand because of public health exigencies, not only will the field be deterred from testing the feasibility of mainstreaming services for mental and addictive disorders into the general health care system, but our research mission will be diffused at the cost of current scientific momentum and future advances."

Response to Waxman

Goodwin made the statement in response to a letter from Chairman Henry Waxman (D-CA) of the House Health Subcommittee who sought clarification of reports that Goodwin had initiated discussions to determine whether the services blocks administered by ADAMHA could be shifted elsewhere at HHS (AR, Oct. 11).

In the Reagan Administration's final budget submission, the ADMS block would be cut back by nearly $6 million to a flat $800 million next fiscal year. The actual amount of funds going for services would be reduced even more by a tap of 5 percent from the total -- or $40 million -- which would be allocated for data collection, services research and technical assistance.

The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 provides that from 5 percent to 15 percent of the overall ADMS block grant appropriation can be set aside for data collection and other activities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

ADAMHA Budget Stresses Research
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.