Advertising with an Attitude: An Aesthetic, Emotional and Intellectual Experience. (on the Art Career Track)

By Patterson, Berniece | Arts & Activities, November 2001 | Go to article overview

Advertising with an Attitude: An Aesthetic, Emotional and Intellectual Experience. (on the Art Career Track)


Patterson, Berniece, Arts & Activities


Career awareness in the art field is very important in education. To introduce advertising design to my fourth- and fifth-grade students, I showed them examples of advertisements in magazines and pamphlets in which the products for sale had been illustrated with a well-known artwork.

I explained that the targeted audience is considered to be composed of tasteful people who are familiar with fine art and appreciate beauty in "the finer things in life." By placing the product within the work of art, the advertising designer is hoping to create the desire in people to buy the product.

LEARNING ABOUT ADVERTISING DESIGN AND RENOWNED

ART We looked at a magazine ad in which a Jaguar automobile had been placed in the middle of a Rousseau-type jungle painting, and discussed its connection to the jaguars that live in the jungle. Students also responded aesthetically to the beauty of the jungle painting.

We observed a pamphlet in which a radio station had reproduced one end of Georges Seurat's Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, and had placed headphones on the people and the monkey. We discussed how the headphones connected the radio station to the painting and added humor. Students responded to the advertisement emotionally through laughter.

We admired a Cheese Nips advertisement in which Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa was holding a box of crackers. The caption stated, "Cheese Nips put a smile on your lips." We discussed the clever combination of a painting of a lady from the 1500s with a modern product, noting that the ad used humor to appeal to our emotions.

Students also discussed a Mercury automobile advertisement that they had seen on TV, which showed a Mercury being driven over the bridge in Edvard Munch's The Scream. Students responded intellectually to the painting because they were familiar with it.

Pretending to be advertising designers for a large company, students were asked to design an ad to promote the sale of a real or imaginary product. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Advertising with an Attitude: An Aesthetic, Emotional and Intellectual Experience. (on the Art Career Track)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.