Multiculturalism's Nascent Stress Points

By Roberts, Paul Craig | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 16, 2001 | Go to article overview

Multiculturalism's Nascent Stress Points


Roberts, Paul Craig, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Paul Craig Roberts

Do you know that there are 15,000 Muslims serving in the U.S. armed forces? Are you aware that the U.S. military has Muslim imams?

Following September 11, Capt. Abd Al-Rasheed Muhammad, Imam of Walter Reed Army Medical Center in D.C., asked the North American Islamic Jurisprudence Council if it is permissible for Muslim troops in the U.S. military to fight other Muslims in the war against terrorism.

The council referred the matter to Muslim clerics abroad, who issued a fatwa permitting U.S. Muslims to fight if there was "no alternative."

Whew. The chain of command of the U.S. military remained intact. But not for long. The Middle East Media Research Institute reports that the Arab clerics reconsidered and withdrew permission on Oct. 30, issuing a new fatwa prohibiting U.S. Muslim troops from participating in U.S. attacks on Muslim forces.

Can you see where multiculturalism has brought us? The chain of command in the U.S. Army has Arab clerics at its head.

The idea of a multicultural state is an obvious insanity. The problems of multicultural politics led to the breakup of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire. In our own time we have witnessed the breakup of the multicultural Yugoslav state and the Russian Empire.

Why do so many educated people believe multiculturalism will work in the U.S.? Or do they believe it?

The political left endorses multiculturalism as an assault on U.S. national identity. Libertarians endorse multiculturalism, because they favor anything that dissolves the state, and there's no better way to dissolve a state than to dissolve national identity.

Neoconservatives endorse multiculturalism, because they see it as endorsement of American values by outsiders. The unending flood of immigrants from different cultures is the neoconservatives' answer to the denigration of American values by the political left.

These positions are understandable if incompatible, but none are legitimate reasons for constructing a political Tower of Babel.

Even under the old rules of the "melting pot," it is doubtful the U.S. could assimilate the high rate of Third World, non-European immigration it has been experiencing for the past three decades. Under the multicultural Balkanization policy in effect, nonassimilation is a guaranteed outcome. …

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