Still Bush's Best Amigo?

Newsweek International, November 26, 2001 | Go to article overview

Still Bush's Best Amigo?


When George W. Bush entered the White House, he had one foreign-policy priority: Latin America. Mexico was the only country that the former Texas governor knew well, and he had big plans for tighter economic and political bonds between all the nations of the Americas. September 11 changed all that. While attending the opening of the U. N. General Assembly two weeks ago, the man Bush has repeatedly called his "amigo," Vicente Fox, had only a brief chat with the U.S. president, who was preoccupied with the war in Afghanistan and regions farther afield. And that was the least of Fox's worries: as the U.S. economy tanks, Mexico's fortunes look ever more bleak and much of his domestic agenda has stalled. But determined to put the best face on his country's prospects, Fox took time from meeting with other heads of state to talk with a group of NEWSWEEK editors in New York. Excerpts:

NEWSWEEK: What did you talk to President Bush about this morning?

FOX: A very quick review of what we're doing together: how we're advancing on money and bank accounts related to terrorism. Border activity--where the flow and the crossing time is back up to 80 percent of what it was two months ago. [I] also suggested that countries should have information daily or monthly on what's going on [with the war effort] so that we can maintain this cohesiveness. Finally, we discussed the bilateral, regional and multilateral agendas. In the case of Mexico and the United States, on Nov. 19 we'll [have bilateral meetings] discussing security, narcotraffic and organized crime, and on Nov. 20 we'll address migration. We're back to business.

What about the economic impact of September 11 on Mexico?

We're discovering that the huge impact of September 11 is on the economies of the world. That's maybe what's building up all this unity. It's not only the dramatic losses in Washington or New York, it's what we're losing all over the world: one whole year of development, maybe two or three. In the case of Mexico, we've been able to navigate with relative success. We have not lost many jobs, our inflation rate is falling, our interest rates are coming down, our reserves are at a historic level, investment keeps flowing in and our currency is strong. Macroeconomically, the fundamentals are strong. On the other hand, we have to worry about protecting small- and medium-size businesses and the jobs we have. We have to do everything possible to return to growth--and this is where our tax reform presented to Congress is key.

Fiscal reform doesn't seem to have gone anywhere, and now you have the rise within the former ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party [PRI] of a more left-wing, union-oriented leadership. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Still Bush's Best Amigo?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.