Concert Tour Entrepreneur. (Middle/High School Software/Web Sites)

By Drag, John, Jr. | Multimedia Schools, October 2001 | Go to article overview

Concert Tour Entrepreneur. (Middle/High School Software/Web Sites)


Drag, John, Jr., Multimedia Schools


Company: Sunburst Technology, 101 Castleton Street, Pleasantville, NY 10570; Phone: 800/321-7511; Fax: 914/747-4109; Web: http://www.sun burst.com/.

Price: $100--single copy price, one Mac/Win hybrid CD-ROM with complete Teacher's Guide. $100--lab pack for 10 computers. $700--school pack of 80 or unlimited network license.

Audience: Grades 7-10.

Format: CD-ROM: text, graphics, music, video.

System Requirements: The Macintosh version requires a 68040 processor, 25 MHz, OS 7.0, 8 MB RAM (depending on system and virtual memory), 4x CD-ROM, and a 640x480 color monitor with 256 colors. Quick-Time is included on the CD.

The Windows version requires Windows 95/98/NT with a 486 processor, 66 MHz, 8 MB RAM, 4x CD-ROM, and a 640x480 color monitor with 256 colors.

Description: Concert Tour Entrepreneur hones skills in mathematics (ratio and percentages) and planning by allowing students to manage their own music group in a realistic business simulation.

Reviewer Comments:

Installation: I reviewed this program on a Power Macintosh G3 computer with OS 8.6. Installation is required.

With a partial installation, the CDROM must be running for the retrieval of resources. Full install capability does exist, however, eliminating the need for the CD. A full installation requires 30 MB (Windows) to 35 MB (Macintosh) of hard disk space. Installation Rating: A

Content/Features: Concert Tour Entrepreneur meets all NCTM standards in regard to data analysis, connections, and problem solving. Specifically, students develop their math aptitude by determining averages; drawing inferences; interpreting graphs, charts, and data; creating budgets; estimating costs; computing percentages; and managing money. Students can determine where their groups will play (a choice of 10 cities), establish ticket prices, sell concert tour items (hats, shirts, and posters), and negotiate their agents' fee.

To begin, a student must take out a business loan. The initial analyses have students considering if it is better to borrow money with a lower percentage rate and repay the loan in a shorter period of time, or to take a higher percentage rate and a longer period of time to repay the money.

Next comes band selection. Concert Tour Entrepreneur features eight different styles of music and 24 bands. Students may browse and select one of the existing bands, or they may choose to create their own. Sample music is available for each band. The program also allows the students to negotiate their agents' fee.

The Main Screen permits access to all parts of the program. Students must schedule concert dates (to include paying for rental of the venue), rehearsals, and rest time for their bands. They must also schedule and purchase advertising. Finally, students must buy and stock concert merchandise for sale and set ticket prices. Working for a big percentage of the profits, students also bank their money and repay their loan(s).

A number of icons within the program make it extremely easy to navigate through other areas--the dollar sign, for example, links directly to the bank. A band icon allows students to get feedback from their client or to re-negotiate their agent's fee.

A click on the "power" button accesses nine different radio stations, each with different types of music.

Of special interest is the spreadsheet function of this program. This feature includes ready-made graphs and tables--costs and sales for each concert, the seating capacity of each venue, merchandise costs and sales, band earnings, student (agent) earnings, and miscellaneous costs and income. …

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