Senate Passes Spending Bill for Labor, Health, Education

By Rigsby, Deborah; Otero, Juan | Nation's Cities Weekly, November 12, 2001 | Go to article overview

Senate Passes Spending Bill for Labor, Health, Education


Rigsby, Deborah, Otero, Juan, Nation's Cities Weekly


The Senate passed an eleventh spending bill, 89-10, for fiscal year 2002 last week, appropriating $123 billion dollars for the Departments of Labor, Education, and Health and Human Services (H.R. 3061).

The measure will increase funding for key municipal programs including youth employment and training and senior services, as well as education and healthcare. A House-Senate conference committee is expected to meet soon to resolve differences in funding allocations for education and health programs. Highlights of the Senate appropriations measure are listed below.

* The Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) would be funded at $2 billion, $300 million above the President's request;

* The Child Care and Development Block Grant would be funded at the President's request of $2.2 billion, $200 million more than last year;

* Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services would be funded with more than $3 billion, including $440 million for the Mental Health Block Grant ($20 million more than the President's request and last year's allocation);

* The Social Services Block Grant (SSBG) would be funded at $1.7 billion. (The House Appropriations committee also restored the authority to transfer 10 percent of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Block Grant [TANF] to SSBG.);

* Programs for dislocated workers would be funded at $1.5 billion, an increase of $136.4 million from fiscal year 2001;

* Youth employment and training programs, authorized under the Workforce Investment Act, would be funded at $2.8 billion, including $55 million for the reintegration of youth offenders;

* Community Health Centers would be funded at $1.3 billion, and increase of $175 million from last year;

* $6.6 billion is allocated for the Head Start program, an increase of $400 million over last year;

* 21st Century Community Learning Centers would benefit from an increase of $154 million, with total funding of $1 billion; and

* Funding would begin for the President's Faith Based Initiative with $30 million for the Compassion Capital Fund and an increase of $70 million for the Promoting Safe and Stable Families program.

H.R. 3061 would also increase overall funding ($48.5 billion) for the Department of Education by $6.3 billion, providing more money for rural education programs authorized in the Senate-passed version of H. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Senate Passes Spending Bill for Labor, Health, Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.