A Wider Conflict? Powell on Bin Laden, Mideast Peace-And Whether We'll Ultimately Go after Iraq

By Weymouth, Lally | Newsweek, December 3, 2001 | Go to article overview

A Wider Conflict? Powell on Bin Laden, Mideast Peace-And Whether We'll Ultimately Go after Iraq


Weymouth, Lally, Newsweek


Byline: Lally Weymouth

Secretary of state Colin Powell has long been viewed as the moderate in an administration of hawks. But Powell insists that complete harmony has prevailed among the administration's decision makers, despite rumors that he has been urging caution on his colleagues in the war on terror. Seated at a conference table in the State Department, Powell spoke with NEWSWEEK's Lally Weymouth last week. Excerpts:

WEYMOUTH: It has been reported that you were opposed to the tougher strategy in Afghanistan taken up by the administration three weeks ago.

POWELL: This is absolute nonsense. We have had an integrated, unified strategy from the beginning. It was my responsibility to help put the coalition together and deal with the diplomatic aspects of our campaign. It was [Defense] Secretary Rumsfeld's responsibility to come up with the war plan that we executed.

So why did the war strategy appear to change?

It didn't change. It never changed. It was a campaign that started out to go after air-defense systems and the military capability of the Taliban. Then it shifted to destroying the training bases of Al Qaeda and Osama bin Laden. It then started focusing on Osama bin Laden himself, and then in a careful, well-designed manner it focused on the Taliban forces in the vicinity of Mazar-e Sharif and north of Kabul. As we got more and more American military Special Forces people into the country, which took time, they could more effectively bring in the air power to assist the Northern Alliance. You had a First World air force and a Fourth World army on the ground, and it took a while to connect the two. And people misread this as some big disagreement within the administration--that somehow we had gotten bogged down.

Will Osama bin Laden be captured?

I think so. I think he is finding it more and more difficult to avoid his fate. There is no country anxious to see him show up as a guest. More and more land is being liberated and made unavailable for him to seek shelter in. The battle in the northern part of the country was quick and decisive. The south will be a little more difficult--you won't have an army like the Northern Alliance. That may take more time, but I think the Taliban's authority has pretty much been destroyed. And now the diplomatic process is catching up with what has happened on the battlefield.

After Afghanistan, should we go on to Iraq?

We keep our eye on Iraq. We know they are trying to develop weapons of mass destruction. We will look at Iraq and every other country that harbors terrorists and see what would be appropriate measures to take. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Wider Conflict? Powell on Bin Laden, Mideast Peace-And Whether We'll Ultimately Go after Iraq
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.