Erroneous Listings Caused Confusion, and Sober Reflection, for Some N.Y. Bankers. (THE N. Y. EXPERIENCE)

ABA Banking Journal, October 2001 | Go to article overview

Erroneous Listings Caused Confusion, and Sober Reflection, for Some N.Y. Bankers. (THE N. Y. EXPERIENCE)


Many publications as well as some websites carried detailed listings of tenants of New York's Twin Towers, including many banks and other financial services companies. Some of these listings were outdated, or just plain wrong. This led to some needless worry and fear, but also to silent prayers of thanks.

Atlantic Bank of New York, part of the National Bank of Greece, was listed as being on the 106th floor of Tower Two. This was two floors above the space occupied by Sandier O'Neill & Partners, the investment banking firm where so many employees are listed as missing and presumed dead. Indeed, 106 was the highest office floor in that tower, with only the observation decks and some equipment rooms higher in the 110-story structure.

Thankfully, the listing was quite wrong. Atlantic Bank had been on that floor, but most operations had moved out in June, its lease was up in August, and nothing was left in the building the day of the disaster.

The space, leased for 15 months, was always temporary "swing space," in real-estate parlance, used to house Atlantic's staff while the bank's headquarters, further uptown at 35th St. and Sixth Ave., was undergoing renovations.

Atlantic had a branch near the disaster site, on Maiden Lane, that was closed by the attack, but as of the week after the attacks that branch, though closed and somewhat damaged, was believed to be structurally sound and was expected to be reopened. …

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