Purchasing a Farm Computer

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), December 8, 2001 | Go to article overview

Purchasing a Farm Computer


Byline: PAT DONNELLY, Dairying Development Adviser, Greenmount College

PURCHASING a computer for the first time or replacing an existing machine can be a traumatic experience.

Questions often asked are:

Is this the best set-up for me?

Am I getting best value for money?

What happens if the machine breaks down?

Will the machine be out-of-date by the end of the year?

All of the above are legitimate concerns. However, with a little bit of research and planning, a lot of the pitfalls can be avoided.

MACHINE LIFE

Computers quickly become outdated in terms of processor speed and memory capacity. However, this does not mean that a computer purchased today will be no use in one year.

A computer with a high specification will have a useful life of at least six years. It may not always handle the latest video games but it will still be able to run office and farm recording packages without any difficulty.

The best advice is to buy as high a specification computer as you can afford.

COMPUTER

SPECIFICATION

The specification of a computer is largely determined by the type of processor and the amount of memory that it contains.

A computer's processor can be likened to the engine of a car, the more powerful it is, the quicker it will be able to carry out tasks.

Random Access Memory (RAM) relates to the ability of a computer to hold information in the memory whilst it carries out other processes.

Computers with RAM in excess of 128Gb will allow the computer to run more powerful and sophisticated programs.

Generally, it is games and communications programs that require a powerful processor and lots of memory.

Farm accounts and herd-recording packages do not require high specification computers for them to run successfully.

An entry level computer with a Celeron 900 processor and 128Mb of RAM, 20Gb hard disk, modem, 15-inch monitor and a printer will cost around pounds 700.

Such a set-up would be sufficient for running office and farm management software whilst providing Internet and E-mail access.

A mid range computer with a Pentium 3 processor running at 1GHz will cost approximately pounds 850.

It will be able to run more demanding programs, provide extra storage space on the hard disk, extra RAM and usually a 17-inch monitor.

At the top end of the market, a computer with a Pentium 4 processor running at 1.6GHz will cost in excess of pounds 1,000.

However, they are the best choice where children will use the computer to play the latest video games. Table 1 provides a comparison of computer specification according to purchase price.

EXTRAS

Scanners can be useful especially where children use the computer for school assignments; they cost from pounds 40-pounds 200 depending on the quality of image required.

It is now possible to purchase an all-in-one printer which can fax, photocopy, scan and print, these machines cost approximately pounds 250-pounds 350 and are a worthwhile investment where space is tight in an office or room. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Purchasing a Farm Computer
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.