Population Research Infrastructure Program. (Fellowships, Grants, & Awards)

Environmental Health Perspectives, August 2001 | Go to article overview

Population Research Infrastructure Program. (Fellowships, Grants, & Awards)


The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), through the Demographic and Behavioral Sciences Branch (DBSB) of the Center for Population Research, invites applications for infrastructure grants in support of population research relevant to the DBSB mission. The primary purposes of the Population Research Infrastructure Program are to provide resources to support and advance research that will improve the understanding of the antecedents and consequences of population structure and change, facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration among investigators conducting population-related research, and promote innovative approaches to population research questions. An additional goal is to facilitate interaction among scientists in locations throughout the United States to contribute to the integration and coordination of population research. Applicants may request funds to support infrastructure and/or research designed to enhance the quality and quantity of population research conducted at an institution and develop new research capabilities to advance population research through innovative approaches.

This request for applications (RFA) invites applications for two types of awards: developmental awards and full-fledged research infrastructure awards. Developmental awards are intended to support the development and demonstrate the feasibility of programs that have high potential for advancing population research but that have not yet fully developed the necessary resources and mechanisms to qualify for a research infrastructure award.

Applicants responding to this RFA must articulate a clear vision for their research unit and its current and future contributions to population research. Applicants must identify the central scientific objectives and signature population-related themes of the unit, and these must be relevant to the DBSB mission, a description of which is available at http:// www.nichd.nih.gov/about/cpr/dbs/dbs.htm. Examples of population research topics that fall within the DBSB mission include 1) antecedents and consequences of changes in population size, structure, and composition, including the relationship of economic development to population change, population modeling and the projection and/or prediction of human population change, and the interrelationship between population and the physical environment; 2) family and household dynamics, including issues related to intergenerational relationships; 3) fertility and family planning, including issues related to union formation and dissolution, births and birth spacing, family size, gender in relation to fertility, and social acceptability of measures for the biological regulation of human fertility; 4) spatial distribution of human population groups and causes and consequences of migration, including issues related to international and internal migration, residential mobility, and interrelationships between population and the environment; 5) demographic aspects of health, morbidity, disability, and mortality, including issues related to the influence of early life on later life development and outcomes, status of children, and the interrelationship between health and socioeconomic status; and 6) social, demographic, and behavioral studies of sexual behavior, sexually transmitted diseases, and contraception. …

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Population Research Infrastructure Program. (Fellowships, Grants, & Awards)
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