Three Months and Countless Tears and Prayers Later: There Are Two Other Important Lessons We Must Address, within the Classroom and in Our Professional Organization Meetings and Leadership Forums. to Prepare Ourselves for Our New World, We Must Emphasize Renewed Public Health Content and Principles, and We Must Introduce Content on Disaster Nursing into Our Curricula. (from the Editor)

By Fitzpatrick, Joyce J. | Nursing and Health Care Perspectives, November-December 2001 | Go to article overview

Three Months and Countless Tears and Prayers Later: There Are Two Other Important Lessons We Must Address, within the Classroom and in Our Professional Organization Meetings and Leadership Forums. to Prepare Ourselves for Our New World, We Must Emphasize Renewed Public Health Content and Principles, and We Must Introduce Content on Disaster Nursing into Our Curricula. (from the Editor)


Fitzpatrick, Joyce J., Nursing and Health Care Perspectives


FOR ALL OF US, LIFE WILL NEVER BE THE SAME. We have learned a difficult lesson about the fragility of life. Together, we have cried, prayed, hugged, and screamed. Many of us have been on the scenes of the disasters, as workers and volunteers, taking blood, providing trauma care, and listening to the tears and fears of the many victims and their families and friends.

Like many other writers, I have been torn between having too much to say and having nothing to say. I have struggled with telling stories over and over, from the first frightening moments in New York City to the accounts of friends and family members who experienced the military presence in our nation's capital. Our own NLN staff members' stories of struggling to reach safety from within a few blocks of the World Trade Center still bring tears to my eyes, as they would to yours.

Symbolically, what was initially dubbed "ground zero" in New York City is now referred to as "ground heroes." Among our rank and file of nursing students and faculty are many heroes and heroines. As educators, we have taken our life lessons to the classroom, helping our students make sense of the human tragedy, just as they must make sense of other pain and suffering in their day-to-day experiences in nursing.

As educators, we must weave lessons of professional responsibility to society into our important critical care and professional issues classes. Never before have the lessons we have learned from studying the wartime heroics of Florence Nightingale been so poignant. But there are two other important lessons we must address, within the classroom and in our professional organization meetings and leadership forums. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Three Months and Countless Tears and Prayers Later: There Are Two Other Important Lessons We Must Address, within the Classroom and in Our Professional Organization Meetings and Leadership Forums. to Prepare Ourselves for Our New World, We Must Emphasize Renewed Public Health Content and Principles, and We Must Introduce Content on Disaster Nursing into Our Curricula. (from the Editor)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.