Culture Club: Intimate Feminism on Stage

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), December 24, 2001 | Go to article overview

Culture Club: Intimate Feminism on Stage


DESPITE - or because - of its provocative title, one particular world-wide hit stage show has attracted performances from a number of the most high-profile actresses in the world.

They include Cate Blanchette, Thadie Newton, Glen Close, Winona Ryder, model and onetime Mrs Mick Jagger Jerry Hall. Plus The X-File's Gillian Anderson, described as the thinking man's crumpet in succession to the woman who held that title in the 1960s, Joan Bakewell, now famous again for appearing on screen on Channel 4 with a live sex show.

Now this particular performance piece, called in other countries The Vagina Monologues, is set to play the island of Ireland just in time for St Patrick's Day 2002 - but under the reined-in title of V-Day Ireland.

The 90-minute production is a distillation of a book edited by American feminist writer Eve Esler who interviewed over 200 women and asked them to talk about that most intimate part of their anatomy.

Fiona McElroy, whose company has obtained the rights for the four-week run, is currently out and about, intent on recruiting prominent Irish women to perform in the show. …

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