Division Report: Technology Education Division)

By Gonzales, Ron | Techniques, January 2002 | Go to article overview

Division Report: Technology Education Division)


Gonzales, Ron, Techniques


Know your VP

Joe Burke is in his third year on the ACTE Board of Directors serving the Technology Education Division. During his tenure, he has served as chair of the Finance and Organization Committee and is currently a member of the Executive Committee. Burke has recently started a new career as a post-secondary instructor for the Builders' Association of Missouri and Kansas after retiring from 32 years of secondary teaching as a technology education instructor. This new position is right down his alley, since he worked as a construction worker and estimator in the early 70s. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in education from Central Missouri State University and postgraduate work from Ottawa University in Kansas.

For nearly 18 years, Burke has been involved in all aspects of ACTE, from being the state president of the Industrial Arts Association of Missouri in 1983 to president of Missouri ACTE in 1985 to being the TED Policy Committee chair and then VP. He is also a former member of the TED Bylaws and Membership Committees and served as chair of the ACTE Bylaws Committee. Burke says that it has been very rewarding and enjoyable to work with such a fine group of professionals over the years. His term as VP expires in June 2002, but he hopes to be able to stay active for many years to come. As he looks back on his term of office, Burke feels confident that the Technology Education Division is stronger than ever, having gained closer ties to the International Technology Education Association, the National Association for Industrial and Technical Teacher Educators, and Epsilon Pi Tau, the International Honorary for Technology.

Working Hard for Technology Education--The MSITE Project

The Industrial Technology Education Program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln submitted a proposal to the National Science Foundation in the fall of 2001. The MSITE project proposes to train math, science and technology education teachers and instructional technology specialists in Nebraska to integrate math and science concepts to help their students achieve difficult-to-reach state and national standards. A key MSITE product is a database of Units of Integrated Professional Teaching Materials, sortable by the standards and available on a Web site. The units have consistency of design and contain a comprehensive set of materials for background, lessons and evaluation. In addition to the 1,250 pre-service and in-service middle and secondary school teachers, 10 methods professors will be trained to ensure that the MSlTE process and products will be passed on to the next generation of teachers.

MSITE has three stages: 1) the development and piloting of prototypes of integrated professional teaching materials by teams of methods professors and doctoral and graduate students; 2) the implementation of workshops to train teachers to develop, use, evaluate and publish the teaching materials and to develop demonstrations of the materials in an electronic format; and 3) an extensive research, dissemination and evaluation stage. …

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