Customs House in Need of Cleaning. (Waste & Abuse)

By Paige, Sean | Insight on the News, June 21, 1999 | Go to article overview

Customs House in Need of Cleaning. (Waste & Abuse)


Paige, Sean, Insight on the News


Tick them off -- bribery, smuggling, theft, conspiracy, assault -- and you have a litany of corruptions that Americans long have associated with life in the badlands south of the U.S.-Mexico border. But increasingly, driven by drug dealing and dollars, similar kinds of corruption also are being found north of that 2,000-mile boundary, perpetrated by our homegrown version of the dreaded federales, who sometimes wear the badges of the U.S. Border Patrol, U.S. Customs Service or U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, or INS.

All three have been racked by an upswing in corruption cases in recent years. But the Customs Service has come in for special scrutiny lately, following a report from the General Accounting Office, or GAO, another by the Department of Treasury's Inspector General and a series of Senate Finance Committee oversight heatings that, while not dwelling exclusively on the negatives, hardly could avoid them altogether.

After reviewing 28 convictions of INS and Customs employees for drug-related corruption between 1992 and 1997, GAO in part blamed the rot on the slowness of both agencies to respond to the growing threat, as well as the lack of serious attention they paid to integrity procedures, background reinvestigations and training. Then, several weeks ago, Treasury's inspector general reported that Customs' internal-affairs office failed to consistently investigate complaints and lacked proper supervisory review. When misconduct was substantiated, "disciplinary penalties were inconsistently applied," often due to cronyism, according to the report. This caused fear of reprisal in officers who considered making allegations against colleagues. Internal-affairs officers at Customs referred only 53 percent of such allegations to management for review. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Customs House in Need of Cleaning. (Waste & Abuse)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.